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Core Laboratories at Dartmouth College

This is a summary list of all core laboratories at Dartmouth College . The list includes links to more detailed information, which may also be found using the eagle-i search app.

Bioinformatics Shared Resource (BISR)

Summary:

The primary mission of the Bioinformatics Shared Resource (BISR) is to support the implementation of bioinformatics resources for cancer research at Dartmouth. Our goal is to provide expert consultation and collaboration for research projects of NCCC members. The Bioinformatics Shared Resource also strives to educate members of the community in different aspects of computational biology by providing regular workshops and seminars.

We provide a wide range of different services including applied bioinformatics and data mining, computer programming and software engineering, database development and programming and high-performance computing and systems administration. We look forward to helping you plan, execute, analyze and interpret your next biomedical research study.



Biomedical NMR Research Center

Summary:

The Biomedical NMR Research Center belongs to the Research Division of the Department of Diagnostic Radiology. Dr. Barjor Gimi is currently Director of the MR center. The Center houses a 7T horizontal bore Varian MR scanner in Vail and a 9.4T horizontal bore Varian MR scanner in Borwell.

Research at the Biomedical NMR Research Center aims to advance applications of NMR techniques for tissue characterization in health and disease. We are developing non-invasive MR techniques to reveal unexplored details of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry in vivo. We use multinuclear MR technique both in imaging and spectroscopy modes and work with several animal models to achieve the goals above.

Biomedical NMR Research Center provides a wide range of in vivo MR protocols for Dartmouth College and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center scientists. These include high resolution anatomical and functional MRI scanning procedures from rodents. Localized ¹H and ³¹P NMR spectroscopy can be acquired from several target organs to map, for instance metabolite concentrations, energy state, intracellular pH or tissue temperature.



Biostatistics Resource

Summary:

We provide scientific interpretation for all statistical analyses. All initial consultations are free. More extensive efforts may require additional funding depending on how much time is required.



Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR)

Summary:

The Biostatistics Shared Resource provides scientific interpretation for all statistical analyses. All initial consultations are free. More extensive efforts may require additional funding depending on how much time is required.

The GeoSpatial Section provides expert consultation and collaboration for research projects in behavior, epidemiology, health services and other disciplines. (see link below), The primary mission of the Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR) is to improve the statistical aspects of cancer research at Dartmouth by providing expert statistical collaboration for research projects of Cancer Center members. Because every aspect of cancer research involves data, all research programs potentially may require the participation of the BSR. Areas of special faculty expertise include clinical trial design, longitudinal data, statistical methods for genomics and managing data, measurement error methods, nonlinear dose response modeling, quality of life data, decision sciences, cost effectiveness analysis, and diagnostic test assessment.

Faculty and staff offices are located on the 8th floor of the Rubin building at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The BSR maintains an extensive statistical software library providing access to all major statistical analysis platforms. Server and network access are provided through Cancer Center administration, DHMC, and Dartmouth College. The BSR collaborates closely with other shared resources for project development and monitoring through the Office of Clinical Research, and the Integrative Biology and Experimental and Translational Models Shared Resources.



Cigarette Smoke Exposure Analysis Laboratory

Summary:

"Our lab is interested in the innate immune system at the mucosal surfaces of the female reproductive and respiratory tracts. A special focus of this work is to determine the effects of cigarette smoke on changes in immune protection. The relationship of cigarette smoke exposure to increased risk of infection is well established, however the mechanisms involved are not. Our research shows that cigarette smoke exposure reduces production of a key antimicrobial chemokine, CCL20. Ongoing research in the lab seeks to determine if similar responses to cigarette smoke exposure underlie increased rates of infection and how cigarette smoke exposure associated infection is linked to the development of cancer."

Consulting; training; planning; experimental management assistance.

Banked tissue samples available for preliminary studies.

Small animal cigarette exposure.



Clinical Pharmacology (CP)

Summary:

The primary function of the Clinical Pharmacology Shared Resource (CPSR) is to support NCCC investigators in the design, analysis, and interpretation of clinical pharmacology objectives in preclinical and clinical studies, including chemoprevention and epidemiological studies. In addition to the biorepository function of our resource we also have bioanalytical hardware, computer hardware, and state-of-the-art commercial software programs for application to individual and population-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling, and modeling drug in vitro and in vivo combination drug effects.



Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility

Summary:

The EM Facility is an institutional resource to meet the electron microscopy needs of faculty, staff and students of the Dartmouth College community, including the College, Thayer School of Engineering, the Dartmouth Medical School, and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. The instruments are housed in the EM wing of Remsen. Because the facility is intended to provide service to all the campus, yet has limited personnel, a major effort is made to provide training in the use of appropriate instruments to enable users to do their own microscopy. In addition to this training, there will be service assistance available for those unable to spend time on the microscopes, and for processing of biopsy samples from DHMC.



Dartmouth Media Research Lab (DMRL) Shared Resource

Summary:

The Dartmouth Media Research Lab (DMRL) specializes in the content coding of all types of media including movies, television programming and advertising. We have an extensive database of top box office hits from 1995 to the present. Past areas of research have included tobacco, alcohol, food, violence, and sexual activity. The team consists of two trained coders and a supervisor who ensures consistency and reliability.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Academic-Industry Core (A-IC)

Summary:

The SYNERGY Academic-Industry Core (A-IC) provides institutional support for translational research and fosters industry partnerships to benefit human health by developing the commercial potential of advances in biomedical research, biomedical engineering, health care outcomes research, and other translational efforts. Such services include intellectual property and entrepreneurship education, asset evaluation and development planning, access to both operating and bricks-and-mortar incubators, outreach to industry as well as private (angel/home office) and venture capital investors.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Biomedical Informatics Core (BIC)

Summary:

The Biomedical Informatics Core (BIC) offers clinical and translational investigators support on informatics tools for cohort discovery, data integration, data management, text mining and visual analytics. In addition, the BIC provides consultative services on integration of data systems and on procedures for research data security.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Bioregistry

Summary:

Currently under development, the SYNERGY Bioregistry is a centralized virtual biorepository that will integrate information about samples from existing and future biorepositories. The Bioregistry will comprise:

A standardized data warehouse of information on existing research biorepositories at Dartmouth
eSample, a research tool to allow tracking of specimens and integration with the Bioregistry
Access to the Dartmouth "freezer farm" of large freezer storage units to support archived materials

The Bioregistry will enhance access to a diverse array of biologic samples, allowing investigators to manage sample collection and storage based on individual project needs and enabling researchers to learn about existing samples that can be used to pursue new clinical and translational studies.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Biostatistics Consultation Core (BCC)

Summary:

The Biostatistics Consultation provides essential statistical and quantitative methods support to Dartmouth investigators, helping to remove impediments to initiating new clinical translational research programs for young physicians and other scientists. When possible, standardized methods will be used for common designs and analyses. However, the BCC will adopt and apply new techniques as appropriate and form templates that can be easily adapted to new projects, such as specialized power calculations for designs involving measurement error, for which the BCC has developed specialized software.

Services

Statistical design and sample-size calculations for all types of study designs, including clinical trials of all phases; observational studies, including cross-sectional cohort designs, case-control studies, and hybrid designs; family studies; administrative database analyses; and studies of diagnostic test assessment/screening



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Clinical Research Unit (CRU)

Summary:

The SYNERGY Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is an outpatient research unit that offers investigators a full array of services for the performance of clinical research. The CRU will be located in Faulkner 4M at DHMC and become fully operational in November 2012. All clinical research, ranging from industry-sponsored, investigator-initiated and multi-center clinical trials are eligible for CRU usage. Trained CRU staff facilitate clinical research and study execution with emphasis on patient safety and research quality. The CRU is available to any Geisel faculty wishing to perform clinical research.

To meet the variety of investigators' needs, we offer a range of services.

Please file a Request Help form to be contacted by the CRU Manager and access CRU support services see
https://synergy.dartmouth.edu/static/docs/cru_lab_form.pdf



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Clinical Trials Office (CTO)

Summary:

The Clinical Trials Office (CTO) supports clinical research study initiation and conduct, including assurance of regulatory and financial compliance. The CTO works to enhance patient safety, promote high-quality research, and create increased standardization and consistency within the overall clinical research enterprise at Dartmouth.

Current responsibilities of the CTO include: clinical trial contract review and negotiation; budget review in collaboration with PI and negotiation with sponsor; financial oversight of the trial with Medicare Coverage Analysis and management of the research billing activities of open trials; regulatory support for investigators, including study monitoring of investigator-initiated trials and registration of studies at clinicaltrials.gov; consistent registration of all new trials in Velos eResearch system prior to study initiation; and education and training for clinical research professionals.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Community-Based Research Core

Summary:

SYNERGY engages regional communities in collaborative clinical and translational research to improve health and health care. Efforts are founded on extensive experience through the Dartmouth CO‑OP Project, a network of community-based clinicians who have developed and refined the model of practice-based research. The Community-Based Research Core provides regional organizations and communities with access to health status data, research tools, and support.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Ethics Consultation Core (ECC)

Summary:

The Ethics Consultation Core (ECC) leverages current ethics activities across Dartmouth, and thus provides the capacity for real-time collaborative ethics advice for investigators throughout the translational research community.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Recruitment and Retention Core (RCC)

Summary:

The Recruitment and Retention Core (RCC) helps investigators make their studies visible across Dartmouth and to the public to increase awareness of clinical study opportunities.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Research Design and Epidemiology Core (RDE)

Summary:

Services:

Hypothesis framing

Overall study design and methods, including clinical trials, cohort, case-control and hybrid designs

Design of intervention, questionnaires, definition of outcomes and predictor variables

Designing and utilizing disease, screening, and other registries

Biomarker development, including application and testing of innovative technologies

Design of behavioral interventions

Study implementation/protocols

Analytic plans and considerations

Interpretation of results



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Administrative Core

Summary:

The Administrative Core serves as the central organizing framework for the Program and provides fiscal and resource management.

The Administrative Core serves as the central organizing framework for the Program.

In addition, the core provides administrative and liaison support and assists with coordination and facilitation of translation and training core activities.

The Administrative Core also coordinates the activities of the Program's External Advisory Committee, which provides program guidance concerning:
• the scientific merit of our research
• the relevance and importance of the individual components to the goals of the Program
• the integration of research across disciplines
• the effectiveness of research translation activities in linking projects and stakeholders
• the appropriateness of community engagement and training activities.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Community Engagement Core

Summary:

Community engagement refers to bi-directional interaction between community stakeholders and our research program. Authentic bi-directional communication between our program and community members allows us to:

Learn about environmental health concerns in local communities;
Determine how the public prioritizes health risks;
Discover what forms of risk communication are most effective;
Develop materials in response to community needs; and
Keep you informed about our research and upcoming events.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Community Research Translation Core

Summary:

The Research Translation Core communicates the Programs' research results in user-friendly formats that will benefit federal and state agencies, non-profits and help grass-roots organizations make informed decisions on issues that affect the health of their communities.

Examples of some of our most recent projects on arsenic and mercury are available on our website. Please contact us if you would like more information on our research, would be interested in discussing a collaboration opportunity, or if you have suggestions for additional ways in which we can reach our stakeholders with information on the ways in which arsenic and mercury impact environmental public health.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Trace Element Analysis Core

Summary:

The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several “hyphenated” techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.


Our ICP-MS instruments can also be coupled with cold vapor generation, gas and liquid chromatography and laser ablation. With these hyphenated analyses we can:

Detect ultra-low levels of arsenic or mercury (< 10 ng/L for arsenic and < 0.02 ng/L for methylmercury)
Differentiate between toxic and nontoxic forms, or species, of arsenic and mercury
Map trace elements within a biological tissue

We are interested in new methods and new applications for hyphenated analyses such as determination of arsenic species in food using chromatography coupled to ICP-MS and the elemental imaging of biological tissues such as placenta and teeth by laser ablation-ICP-MS.

The TEA lab supports Dartmouth College researchers in the Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury and the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Training Core

Summary:

The Training Core supports undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral level interdisciplinary training in fields related to environmental health and environmental science and engineering. By enhancing cross-training of students in disciplines not traditionally connected, the core is able to enhance the interdisciplinary nature of the Program.

We organize a range of training activities that help researchers at the beginning of their scientific careers develop into highly motivated, productive, interdisciplinary scientists. See website for details



Department of Physics: Apparatus Shop Core Laboratory



Genomics and Molecular Biology (GMB)

Summary:

The Microarray and Next-Gen Sequencing Section provides technologies that enable profiling of gene expression, miRNA, GpC Island, and CGH on a whole-genome scale, and provides high-quality genomics and microarray data. (see link below)

The Molecular Biology Section provides DNA fragment analysis qPCR, Sanger sequencing and NanoString Technology. (see link below)



Geospatial Resource

Summary:

The GeoSpatial Resource Supports geospatial analysis by providing expert consultation and collaboration for research projects in behavior, epidemiology, health services, and other disciplines.

For more detailed information see http://cancer.dartmouth.edu/documents/pdf/shared_resources_march2012.pdf listed below as a website.



Immune Monitoring and Flow Cytometry Resource (IMFC)

Summary:

DartLab is a Shared Resource that is used both by basic scientists and by clinicians carrying out mechanistic studies for clinical trials. Services are also available to non-Dartmouth clients. The consolidated Shared Resource moves beyond the simple provisioning of technical services to making complex experiments possible by providing scientific and technological support for implementing advanced, high-complexity assays in a cost-effective way, and by providing a mechanism for the acquisition of new methodologies.

We carry out a spectrum of immunoassays and can develop customized immunoassays to suit your studies. We provide dedicated instruments for your use including cell sorters, flow cytometers, an ELISPOT reader, a Bio-Plex array reader and a Sector Imager, an autoMACS and a Robosep.
Whole Blood Services

* Flow Cytometry
* Whole blood processing
* Cell Subset Enrichment
* Education
* Clinical Trial Studies



Irradiation, Pre-clinical Imaging, and Microscopy (IPIM)

Summary:

The Irradiation Resource (see link) assists investigators in radiation treatment planning and delivery of ionizing irradiation to cells, rodents, large animals and spontaneous animal tumors. Pre-clinical Imaging provides technologies for non-invasive, whole-animal imgaing of rodents used in preclinical research studies.

The Microscopy Section (see link ) provides access to point scanning confocal microscopy, conventional bright field and flourescence light microscopy, and image analysis resources. The facility provides individual and group training for operation of the light microscopes



Irradiation, Preclinical Imaging, & Microscopy (IPIM) Shared Resource

Summary:

We have expanded the previous NCCC Irradiation Shared Resource (137Cs irradiator and 6-18 MeV linear accelerator) to include Optical Cellular Microscopy (Confocal Microscopy) and Electron Microscopy, as well as state-of-the-art Preclinical Imaging (large and small animal). The new resource now is called the Irradiation, Preclinical Imaging, & Microscopy (IPIM) Shared Resource. The IPIM mission is to use these facilities to support investigators in solving basic and clinical cancer research questions. It is also our goal to promote NCCC investigator awareness of these facilities and to continue to provide the most sophisticated and relevant technologies to NCCC and associated investigators. All resource staff are committed individually to the generation of the highest quality and most meaningful results through personalized instruction and support of each project.



Microarray and Next-Gen Sequencing Resource

Summary:

The Genomics Shared Resource provides technologies to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and Dartmouth community investigators that enable profiling of gene expression, miRNA, GpC Island, and CGH on a whole-genome scale. The long-term goal of the Genomics Shared Resource is to provide an efficient and affordable fee-for-service operation that will provide high quality genomics and microarray data for the growing number of Cancer Center investigators who require this service.



Microscopy Shared Resource

Summary:

The Microscopy Shared Resource strives to provide reliable and affordable access to point scanning confocal microscopy, conventional bright field and fluorescence light microscopy, and image analysis resources. The facility provides individual and group training for operation of the light microscopes. Training is intended to provide an understanding of the basic light microscopy and digital imaging principles involved. Training for our microscope use and imaging consultation is open to all members of Dartmouth College, Geisel School of Medicine, DHMC, and outside users.

Capabilities

The Facility Manager provides free personalized training for operation of all microscopes and software in the facility. A two-hour introduction to digital imaging, confocal and two-photon microscopy is offered 5-6 times a year. Additional hands-on confocal training is provided as part of our program to qualify users for independent use and 24/7 access to the Zeiss LSM510 confocal microscope. Troubleshooting of problems or alignment issues on investigator microscopes is also available at no charge.

The Facility Manager is available to work with investigators using the microscopes at an additional hourly cost. Please contact Ken Orndorff-Facility Manager to consult prior to performing specimen labeling and mounting.
Usage

Consultation and advice for specimen preparation and fluorophore choice is available on request.

Only fully trained and authorized users will be able to see confocal schedule. All microscopes accessed 24/7 for trained users. Contact for fee schedule: Kenneth.A.Orndorff@Dartmouth.edu



Molecular Biology Resource

Summary:

This core facility provides molecular biology products, services, and support to help investigators solve their basic, translational, and clinical research problems. Our services include DNA fragment analysis, qPCR, Sanger sequencing and NanoString Technology. It is our goal to offer the highest quality products and services possible in the most cost effective manner.



Pathology Shared Resource (PSR)

Summary:

Our mission is to facilitate project planning, clinical validation and implementation of novel translational technology and research in the fields of molecular diagnostics, molecular therapeutics, pharmacogenomics, quantitative morphologic image analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a CLIA-certified, CAP-accredited laboratory ensuring optimal clinical quality assurance. This past year, the TRL expanded its physical footprint by moving all the histology services to a 5th floor research module in order to reorganize and expand the molecular biology and imaging services in the 6th floor lab.



Science Division Electronics Shop

Summary:

David Collins is NASA certified for electrical assembly.



Shared Equipment Rubin 6 and 7

Summary:

Dartmouth researchers have access to 37 Shared Resource instruments which are housed in various labs throughout the 6th and 7th floors of the Rubin building.

Please note:
See individual instruments and protocols for location and the lab responsible.
No cost is involved; be sure to clean up when finished.
The "responsible lab" provides necessary instrument training.



Shared Instruments Core Laboratory



Speed Congenics Resource

Summary:

The Speed Congenics Service facilitates the development of congenic mice in support of pre-clinical projects; provides expert advice on mouse speed congenic development, mouse genetic background analysis, and mouse genetic mapping.



The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice: Data and Analytic Core (DAC)

Summary:

The Data and Analytic Core (DAC) includes research analysts and programmers, research assistants, a data librarian, and a Director who reports to the Director of the Center for Health Policy Research and the DAC Advisory Committee.

The DACs responsibilities are to maintain an extremely secure environment for health care datasets provided to Principal Investigators by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, state governments, and other organizations under data use agreements and licenses. The DAC works under the direction of faculty investigators who have specific permission to use the data to conducted research.

The DAC consists of 15 analysts (and an additional 5 staff) with a combined 150 years of healthcare claims analytic experience and a mastery of a broad range of programming and statistical methods. New analysts undergo a comprehensive training program lasting the better part of 6 months to assure a strong foundation in Medicare data analytics.



Trace Element Analysis (TEA)

Summary:

The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several "hyphenated" techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.



Trace Element Analysis (TEA)

Summary:

The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several "hyphenated" techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.



Transgenics and Genetic Constructs (TGC)

Summary:

The Transgenics and Genetic Constructs Resource (see link) supports the generation and utilization of genetically modified mice by members of the Dartmouth research community. We offer a wide variety of services that assist researchers in construct design and creation of novel transgenic mice. We also offer mice with a human immune system that allows our investigators a better way to study viruses and other human infections. The

Speed Congenics Service (see link) facilitates the development of congenic mice in support of pre-clinical projects. We provide expert advice on mouse speed congenic development, mouse genetic background analysis and mouse genetic mapping.



Transgenics and Genetic Constructs Resource

Summary:

We support the generation and utilization of genetically modified mice by members of the Dartmouth research community. We offer a wide variety of services that assist researchers in construct design and creation of novel transgenic mice. We also offer mice with a human immune system that allows our investigators a better way to study virus and other human infections.



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