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Resource Providers at Dartmouth College

This is a summary list of all resource providers at Dartmouth College . The list includes links to more detailed information, which may also be found using the eagle-i search app.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Type: Government Agency

Summary:

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances.



Aging Resource Center

Type: Center

Summary:



The Aging Research program at The Dartmouth Institute is a leader in health services research aimed at improving health and health care for older Americans. A special focus is advancing the use of decision science, decision support, and shared decision making for older adults.

The ultimate aim of the Aging Research program is to change health care practice and policy to promote integrated and coordinated care, and mental and physical health promotion and self-management.

Aging Research is one of three areas directed by Stephen J. Bartels, MD, MS, and designed to create a bridge between research, education and clinical programs. Together, the Dartmouth Centers for Health & Aging, funded through a combination of federal grants, foundation grants, philanthropic donations, and institutional support from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, work to improve the health and quality of life of older adults and their families.



Ahmed Genetics Lab

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Our research uses Drosophila as a model to study the evolutionarily conserved Wnt/Wingless signal transduction pathway, with a focus on one component in this pathway, Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Wnt/Wingless signaling directs cell proliferation, cell fate, and apoptotic cell death during development and is inappropriately activated in several types of cancer. The majority of colorectal carcinomas have truncating mutations in APC, a negative regulator in Wnt signaling. APC functions in a protein complex that targets the key transcriptional activator in the pathway, beta-catenin, for proteasomal degradation. Thus inactivation of APC results in ectopic Wnt signaling, and the aberrant activation of target genes. The primary goals of our research are to determine the molecular mechanisms by which APC regulates Wnt signaling, and the molecular consequences of APC loss.



American Cancer Society, Inc.

Type: Funding Organization

Summary:

Dedicated to helping persons who face cancer. Supports research, patient services, early detection, treatment and education.



Barlowe Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The research program is focused on understanding protein and lipid transport through the early secretory pathway in eukaryotic cells. This is an essential process that initiates the delivery of proteins to intracellular organelles and to the cell surface for secretion. Because of the advantage for genetic analyses, we investigate this process mainly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our primary interest is elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie vesicular transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Transport between these compartments is mediated by membrane vesicles, termed COPII vesicles, that bud from the ER and fuse with and/or form the Golgi complex. Our studies combine molecular genetics, proteomics and microscopy with cell free assays that measure COPII-dependent transport. This cell free transport reaction proceeds through the biochemically distinct stages of COPII-dependent vesicle budding, Uso1p-dependent vesicle tethering and SNARE protein-dependent membrane fusion. We have reproduced these stages with isolated membranes and purified soluble molecules. A long-term goal of my research program is to reconstitute distinct sub-reactions in ER/Golgi transport with defined protein and lipid fractions for elucidation of catalytic mechanisms.



Barth & Smith Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Breast Cancer Program
Cancer / Oncology
Endocrine Tumors Program
Gastrointestinal & Pancreatic Cancer Program
General Surgery
Melanoma / Skin Cancer Program
Surgical Oncology



Berwin Immunology Lab

Type: Laboratory



BioInformatics Service Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The BioInformatics Service Center provides the backbone computational tools, databases and domain expertise that facilitates modern biomedical, biological and genomic research.

Our areas of focus are Cancer Registries (research), Clinical Trials and Prevention Studies and Genomics and Proteomics bioinformatics.

Our goals:
to develop, implement and maintain systems which facilitate high-quality data management for Dartmouth and Dartmouth-affiliated research

to develop new and reusable techniques in research computing which increase efficiency, ensure data integrity and security, and reduce research costs

to provide high-quality technical assistance and user support to our researchers and user base

to make our resource available to researchers in the community requiring consultation or programming assistance

to consult with new studies to help investigators plan wisely to meet their study’s informatics needs



Bioinformatics Shared Resource (BISR)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The primary mission of the Bioinformatics Shared Resource (BISR) is to support the implementation of bioinformatics resources for cancer research at Dartmouth. Our goal is to provide expert consultation and collaboration for research projects of NCCC members. The Bioinformatics Shared Resource also strives to educate members of the community in different aspects of computational biology by providing regular workshops and seminars.

We provide a wide range of different services including applied bioinformatics and data mining, computer programming and software engineering, database development and programming and high-performance computing and systems administration. We look forward to helping you plan, execute, analyze and interpret your next biomedical research study.



Biological Sciences Greenhouses

Type: Center

Summary:

The Biological Sciences Greenhouse was built in 2011. It is located on the roof of the Class of 1978 Biological Sciences Building.

The greenhouse has an orchid collection of about 1000 orchids. The orchids were donated by Alan Brout (class of '51). They are housed in a warm orchid room and a cool orchid room.
There is a tropical room, a sub-tropical room, and a xeric (cacti and succulents) room. There are also seven research greenhouse rooms. All greenhouse rooms are computer-controlled with humidity, lights, and temperature settings.

We support Dartmouth graduate students, post-docs, and faculty in their plant and ecological research. We also support undergraduate Dartmouth biology classes.

While continuing our primary educational and research missions, we are also open to the public to enjoy our 'living botanical museum'. Group tours are available. The hours for the public are Monday though Friday, 8:30 am to 4 pm.

(Plant Family descriptions sources include: Encyclopædia Online Britannica, TheFreeDictionary.com, Wikipedia, wildlifeofhawaii.com)



Biomedical Data Science Department

Type: Department

Summary:

The mission of the department of Biomedical Data Science at Geisel School of Medicine is to advance scholarship and education for the quantitative and computational analysis of biomedical and health data and to unite and promote Biomedical Informatics and Biostatistics as essential disciplines for the mentoring and academic development of faculty and the training and education of the next generation of data scientists.

Research Labs:
Biomedical Statistical Science Laboratory (BSSL)
Computational Epi-Informatics Laboratory (CEIL)
Informatics Collaboratory for Design, Development and Dissemination (ic3d)
Mathematical Biostatistics and Image Analysis Laboratory (MBIAL)
Population Health Laboratory (PHL)
Statistical Genetics Laboratory (SGL)
Statistical Genomics Laboratory (SGL)

Twitter: #datascience



Biomedical NMR Research Center

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Biomedical NMR Research Center belongs to the Research Division of the Department of Diagnostic Radiology. Dr. Barjor Gimi is currently Director of the MR center. The Center houses a 7T horizontal bore Varian MR scanner in Vail and a 9.4T horizontal bore Varian MR scanner in Borwell.

Research at the Biomedical NMR Research Center aims to advance applications of NMR techniques for tissue characterization in health and disease. We are developing non-invasive MR techniques to reveal unexplored details of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry in vivo. We use multinuclear MR technique both in imaging and spectroscopy modes and work with several animal models to achieve the goals above.

Biomedical NMR Research Center provides a wide range of in vivo MR protocols for Dartmouth College and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center scientists. These include high resolution anatomical and functional MRI scanning procedures from rodents. Localized ¹H and ³¹P NMR spectroscopy can be acquired from several target organs to map, for instance metabolite concentrations, energy state, intracellular pH or tissue temperature.



Biomedical Statistical Science Laboratory (BSSL)

Type: Service providing laboratory

Summary:

The goal of the Biomedical Statistical Science Laboratory (BSSL) is to develop statistical methods for noncompliance in surgical clinical trials, covariate measurement error for nonlinear regression models and image based research.



Biostatistics Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

We provide scientific interpretation for all statistical analyses. All initial consultations are free. More extensive efforts may require additional funding depending on how much time is required.



Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Biostatistics Shared Resource provides scientific interpretation for all statistical analyses. All initial consultations are free. More extensive efforts may require additional funding depending on how much time is required.

The GeoSpatial Section provides expert consultation and collaboration for research projects in behavior, epidemiology, health services and other disciplines. (see link below), The primary mission of the Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR) is to improve the statistical aspects of cancer research at Dartmouth by providing expert statistical collaboration for research projects of Cancer Center members. Because every aspect of cancer research involves data, all research programs potentially may require the participation of the BSR. Areas of special faculty expertise include clinical trial design, longitudinal data, statistical methods for genomics and managing data, measurement error methods, nonlinear dose response modeling, quality of life data, decision sciences, cost effectiveness analysis, and diagnostic test assessment.

Faculty and staff offices are located on the 8th floor of the Rubin building at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The BSR maintains an extensive statistical software library providing access to all major statistical analysis platforms. Server and network access are provided through Cancer Center administration, DHMC, and Dartmouth College. The BSR collaborates closely with other shared resources for project development and monitoring through the Office of Clinical Research, and the Integrative Biology and Experimental and Translational Models Shared Resources.



Brinckerhoff Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Brinckerhoff's laboratory studies Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes with the traditional role of degrading the extracellular matrix, but also with new and novel functions that include activating receptors and growth factors, mediating apoptosis and facilitating angiogenesis. The focus is on the collagenases (MMP-1 and MMP-13) that mediate connective tissue destruction in arthritic diseases and that contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis. She and her colleagues are investigating the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the over expression of these enzymes, with the goal of specifically blocking their aberrant expression and reducing disease pathology.



COBRE Center for Lung Biology Research

Type: Center

Summary:

Lung disease is the third most frequent cause of death in this country, claiming ~360,000 Americans annually. Tragically, an additional 25 million live with chronic lung diseases including asthma, emphysema, cancer and cystic fibrosis. Unfortunately, the number of individuals wih lung disease is increasing at an alarming rate.

The Dartmouth Lung Biology Center aims to gain a better understanding of the etiology of lung disease and to study new therapeutics for the treatment of lung disease. The Dartmouth Lung Biology Center is grounded in basic research and embraces a translational approach to promote bidirectional bench-to-bedside research.



Calsbeek Evolutionary Ecology Lab

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Reproductive costs of the Anolis lizard, sexual conflict of the Anolis lizard, male-limited dorsal pattern polymorphism in anoles, experimental manipulations of whole island populations of the Anolis lizard to study natural selection.



Cancer and Leukemia Group B

Type: Funding Organization

Summary:

The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) is a national clinical research group sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, with the Central Office headquartered at the University of Chicago and Statistical Center located at Duke University. Founded in 1956, the CALGB brings together clinical oncologists and laboratory investigators to develop better treatments for cancer. CALGB has grown exponentially over the years into a national network of 26 university medical centers, more than 200 community hospitals and more than 3,000 oncology specialists who collaborate in clinical research studies. These studies aim to reduce morbidity and mortality from cancer, relate biological characteristics of cancer to clinical outcomes, and develop new strategies for the early detection and prevention of cancer.



Cell and Molecular Analysis

Type: Clinical Organization

Summary:

Genomics & Molecular Biology (GMB)
Bioinformatics (BISR)
Immune Monitoring & Flow Cytometry (MFC)



Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Cancer Imaging

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Cancer Imaging is a multi-institutional research center promoting and conducting comparative effectiveness research (CER) on imaging in clinical cancer care. The Center was established at Dartmouth with support from the National Cancer Institute to provide a national infrastructure for CER initiatives in cancer imaging.

The Center for CER in Cancer Imaging combines the resources of:

* Dartmouth Medical School, an established center of expertise in CER through The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and Norris Cotton Cancer Center
* American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and its Statistical Center at Brown University, which conducts clinical studies of advanced imaging technologies for cancer detection, staging, and treatment
* Tufts Evidence-Based Practice Center (EPC), which has expertise in systematic review for diagnostic technologies
* National Oncologic PET Registry (NOPR)

The Center for CER in Cancer Imaging advances research and new approaches for studying the impact of advanced imaging in cancer on health and health care utilization, with attention to the consequences of significant incidental diagnostic findings on patient care.

Current projects are based on the National Lung Screening Trial, a major NCI-sponsored study, and the National Oncologic PET Registry, sponsored by the American College of Radiology and the Academy of Molecular Imaging.



Center for Genomic Medicine

Type: Center

Summary:

Vision Statement:
Genomic and other profiling technologies will lead to significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The Center for Genomic Medicine will provide a broad level of support for profiling patient samples, for the interpretation of findings, and for the design of studies related to personalized medicine.

Functions:
Profiling patient samples – the center will serve as resource for identifying and developing tests, facilitate access by researchers to samples and data, by fostering biobanking activities and supporting data capture. The center will work with geneticists to identify and curate family information to support research on new screening and prevention procedures for very high risk individuals.
Interpretation of Findings – the Center will develop and implement novel procedures for annotation from genomic and next generation profiling procedures.
Design of Studies – The Center will assist investigators to develop studies relevant to personalized medicine activities. Functions include the design of clinical trials allowing for individual disease characteristics such as according to tumor mutations or pharmacogenetic profiles. The Center will also provide assistance in the design of population based studies that seek to identify individual causes for disease.



Center for Health Policy Research at The Dartmouth Institute

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Health Policy Research at TDI blends teaching, research, outreach, and policy development to educate and inform. Through innovative initiatives and broad collaboration, CHPR is a force for changing the delivery, access, and financing of health care in America.

Center leaders and staff ponder critical, previously unasked questions. Is more necessarily better? What is the 'right' size of the physician workforce? Are we guilty of too much diagnosis of disease?

Home to the Dartmouth Atlas Project, the Center has expanded its work on geographic variation to document the underuse of effective care, misuse of preference-sensitive care, and overuse of supply-sensitive care in the U.S. health care system.

The faculty at the Institute is instrumental in revealing that forces besides scientific advances and public demand have contributed to the crisis in American health care over the last quarter of the 20th century.



Center for Informed Choice at The Dartmouth Institute

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Informed Choice is dedicated to one simple proposition: that patients deserve to be equal partners in making choices about their health care. We know that when patients and their families have good information about procedures, treatments, and therapies, they make good decisions – decisions that reflect their values and preferences. Our research shows that those of our patients who benefit from our shared decision making process are making well informed choices that match their goals and values. Most importantly, research has shown that these patients have better clinical outcomes and higher rates of satisfaction.



Center for Leadership and Improvement at The Dartmouth Institute

Type: Center

Summary:

The mission of the Center for Leadership and Improvement is to foster the development of people who, in specific settings, will advance the measurement, organization and improvement of patient care quality, safety and value as part of the process of the ongoing reform of health care.

The Center is composed of four major interwoven themes:

1. Clinical Care Improvement Leadership Development—A focus on the knowledge and skill needed to appraise and assimilate scientific evidence, systematically evaluate particular contexts, lead the improvement of actual patient care and measurement of changed performance in organized settings.

2. Patient Safety Sciences—A focus on the knowledge and skill needed to make health care more reliable in real settings of care.

3. Health Professional Development—A focus on the knowledge and skill needed by health professionals to engage in and lead practice-based learning and improvement.

4. Quality Literature Program—A focus on the development and dissemination of the knowledge and skills needed to continuously improve the scholarly literature for the improvement of health care.

Together they will address the problems of the formation of health professionals, the contexts in which they learn and practice, and the outcomes experienced by patients—and will recognize the interconnections of the learning and patient care. Using performance measurement and tests of change, models of reflective practice will be developed and studied. As the Center adapts to the various opportunities in support of its mission, its priorities are certain to continue to change as it maintains a spirit of vitality and flexibility.



Center for Molecular Epidemiology at Dartmouth

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Molecular Epidemiology is an Institutional Development Award (IDeA), funded by the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, that is transforming the research capacity at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine by stimulating high impact research, and translating cutting-edge approaches to enhance human health discoveries. The five-year Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grants support thematic, multidisciplinary centers that augment and strengthen institutional biomedical research capacity.



Center for Surgical Innovation (CSI)

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Surgical Innovation is a one-of-a-kind research facility dedicated to improving surgical procedures and developing new surgical tools and technologies to improve patient care.

The CSI is a joint collaboration between Dartmouth-Hitchcock, the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth, with capital funding from the National Institutes of Health.



Center for Technology and Behavioral Health

Type: Center

Summary:

Focused on the development, evaluation and dissemination of technology-based therapeutic tools targeting substance use and co-occurring behavioral health issues.
The Center for Technology and Behavioral Health (CTBH) is a P30 “Center of Excellence” funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Comprised of an interdisciplinary team of leaders in behavioral science and technology, CTBH aims to draw on the dynamic synergy between innovation, rigorous evaluation, and strategic dissemination to lead transformations in delivery of evidence-based behavioral health care using technology.



Chang Biochemistry Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests include cholesterol trafficking and structure-function of cholesterol acyltransferase.



Chen Biology Lab

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Areas of expertise include ecotoxicology, aquatic ecology, and multiple stressors.



Childrens Oncology Group

Type: Funding Organization

Summary:

The Children’s Oncology Group (COG), a National Cancer Institute supported clinical trials group, is the world’s largest organization devoted exclusively to childhood and adolescent cancer research. The COG unites more than 7,500 experts in childhood cancer at more than 200 leading children’s hospitals, universities, and cancer centers across North America, Australia, New Zealand, and Europe in the fight against childhood cancer.

Today, more than 90% of 13,500 children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer each year in the United States are cared for at Children’s Oncology Group member institutions. COG’s unparalleled collaborative efforts provide the information and support needed to answer important clinical questions in the fight against cancer.

The Children’s Oncology Group has nearly 100 active clinical trials open at any given time. These trials include front-line treatment for many types of childhood cancers, studies aimed at determining the underlying biology of these diseases, and trials involving new and emerging treatments, supportive care, and survivorship.

The Children’s Oncology Group research has turned children’s cancer from a virtually incurable disease 50 years ago to one with a combined 5-year survival rate of 80% today. Our goal is to cure all children and adolescents with cancer, reduce the short and long-term complications of cancer treatments, and determine the causes and find ways to prevent childhood cancer.



Cigarette Smoke Exposure Analysis Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

"Our lab is interested in the innate immune system at the mucosal surfaces of the female reproductive and respiratory tracts. A special focus of this work is to determine the effects of cigarette smoke on changes in immune protection. The relationship of cigarette smoke exposure to increased risk of infection is well established, however the mechanisms involved are not. Our research shows that cigarette smoke exposure reduces production of a key antimicrobial chemokine, CCL20. Ongoing research in the lab seeks to determine if similar responses to cigarette smoke exposure underlie increased rates of infection and how cigarette smoke exposure associated infection is linked to the development of cancer."

Consulting; training; planning; experimental management assistance.

Banked tissue samples available for preliminary studies.

Small animal cigarette exposure.



Clinical Pharmacology (CP)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The primary function of the Clinical Pharmacology Shared Resource (CPSR) is to support NCCC investigators in the design, analysis, and interpretation of clinical pharmacology objectives in preclinical and clinical studies, including chemoprevention and epidemiological studies. In addition to the biorepository function of our resource we also have bioanalytical hardware, computer hardware, and state-of-the-art commercial software programs for application to individual and population-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling, and modeling drug in vitro and in vivo combination drug effects.



Cole Genetics Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests include fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to examine the dynamics of Dbp5, a DEAD-box protein at nuclear pore complexes and assembly and function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the role of the nuclear envelope in NPC biogenesis.



Compton Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Work in this lab is aimed at understanding how chromosomes segregate efficiently during mitosis and meiosis in vertebrate cells. Using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, the assembly and function of the microtubule-based spindle is being dissected at the molecular level. This work has led to the characterization of both structural and motor proteins that are necessary for the organization of the microtubules into spindles during mitosis and meiosis. Current work is aimed at how this process is regulated during the cell cycle and at how these proteins coordinate chromosome movement during cell division.



Computational Epi-Informatics Laboratory (CEIL)

Type: Service providing laboratory

Summary:

The goal of the Computational Epi-Informatics Laboratory (CEIL) is to study how real world healthcare is delivered through analysis of time-oriented, population-based electronic health data. Our research leads to innovative software that can allow patients, clinicians, and policymakers to visualize and understand dynamic healthcare processes and make optimal decisions in seeking the best pathways.



Computational Molecular Biology, Gene Regulation Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Dartmouth Biomedical Engineering Center (DBEC)

Type: Center

Summary:

The Dartmouth Biomedical Engineering Center is a collaborative effort that combines materials research, engineering design, and orthopaedic implant evaluation and application in an interactive teaching environment. Since the early 1970s, the Dartmouth Biomedical Engineering Center has evaluated more than 11,000 retrieved orthopaedic devices. Each retrieved device is examined visually, photographed, and rated for clinical damage. Additional material-specific testing is done to assess and understand the observed changes in the devices that occur in vivo.

The response of biomaterials to patient demands reveals strengths and weaknesses of both the materials themselves and the design of the components in which they are used. The insights generated through formal assessment of the changes in these materials and devices provide the means to improve patient outcomes, which is the primary goal of the Dartmouth Biomedical Engineering Center.

Over the last 30 years DBEC has examined over 9000 orthopedic implants sent to us by more than 900 surgeons. You are invited to send your retrieved orthopaedic implants to our laboratory for an analysis and report, complete with digital photographs, provided at no cost to you. http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/dbec/Dartmouth-Retrieval-Form.pdf


Current research projects include:

Damage vs. Wear in Knees - An Important Distinction
Tibial Spine Integrity in Posterior Stabilized Knees
Understanding the (Historical) Properties of UHMWPE - What's in Those Millions of Patients?
In-vivo Oxidation Measurement
Accelerated Aging of Polyethylene
Transvinylene Index (TVI) as a Marker
Cross-linked Polyethylenes: Hot Competitors in the Marketplace
Ceramic-on-Ceramic Hips - The Squeaky Wheel?
Metal-on-Metal Hips - Is Corrosion Affecting the Latest Generation?
Corrosion of Modular Interfaces in Arthroplasty Devices



Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries

Type: Library

Summary:

The Biomedical Libraries consist of:
the Dana Biomedical Library on the Medical School's Hanover campus and the Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library (MFHSL) at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The Biomedical Libraries are part of the Dartmouth College Library system.

"Our mission is to provide health and life sciences information resources and services that advance research and scholarship, education, and patient-care activities of Geisel School of Medicine, DHMC, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice (TDI), the Dartmouth College Department of Biological Sciences, and The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science."



Dartmouth Biospecimen Storage Facility Service (DBSF)

Type: Repository

Summary:

The DBSF is for long term storage, generally for archival and back up specimens (e.g. -140⁰C, -80⁰C, -20⁰C and 4⁰C)

The facility is also equipped with 24/7 real-time and surveillance cameras

The facility has redundant 24/7 temperature monitoring with alarms for each freezer and emergency response upon alarm by DBSF staff:

The Facility is OHSA compliant and meets Dartmouth EHS policies and standards.

Please see protocols for documents on:
Applicants Summary Fact Sheet
Operating Policy
Permitted User Certification
Storage Facility Application
Official Comprehensive SOP'S
PI Certification, Permitted Users and Certification



Dartmouth Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence

Type: Center

Summary:

Dartmouth has been designated as a Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) with a grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The CCNE places Dartmouth among top centers in cancer nanotechnology research nationwide and takes full advantage of Dartmouth's culture of cross-disciplinary collaboration. CCNEs are tasked with integrating nanotechnology into basic and applied cancer research in order to provide new solutions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

The Dartmouth Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence focuses on the development and optimization of novel antibody-tagged iron-core magnetic nanoparticles activated through alternating magnetic field exposure for the treatment of solid tumors in the breast and ovary.



Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The EM Facility is an institutional resource to meet the electron microscopy needs of faculty, staff and students of the Dartmouth College community, including the College, Thayer School of Engineering, the Dartmouth Medical School, and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. The instruments are housed in the EM wing of Remsen. Because the facility is intended to provide service to all the campus, yet has limited personnel, a major effort is made to provide training in the use of appropriate instruments to enable users to do their own microscopy. In addition to this training, there will be service assistance available for those unable to spend time on the microscopes, and for processing of biopsy samples from DHMC.



Dartmouth Immunology COBRE

Type: Center

Summary:

Investigators with the Dartmouth Immunology COBRE, supported by a grant from the NCRR IDeA program at the NIH, are investigating new means of understanding and harnessing the immune system to prevent, diagnose and treat human diseases.



Dartmouth Media Research Lab (DMRL) Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Dartmouth Media Research Lab (DMRL) specializes in the content coding of all types of media including movies, television programming and advertising. We have an extensive database of top box office hits from 1995 to the present. Past areas of research have included tobacco, alcohol, food, violence, and sexual activity. The team consists of two trained coders and a supervisor who ensures consistency and reliability.



Dartmouth Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS)

Type: Center

Summary:

The Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) provides advice and guidance to the Dartmouth Community on occupational safety and environmental protection issues. EHS manages the College's chemical, biological and radiological use, oversees occupational and research safety and plays an essential role in emergency preparedness

Computer based training modules are all available through the EHS website and BIORAFT.



Dartmouth SYNERGY | The Dartmouth Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Type: Institute

Summary:

SYNERGY supports Dartmouth researchers in all phases of clinical and translational research, from preclinical research in the basic and population sciences to development of clinical protocols to community practice-based research.

SYNERGY aims to build research focus and passion among trainees from diverse disciplines by empowering them with the skills and pathways needed to build successful careers in clinical and translational research.

Building upon Dartmouth's demonstrated strengths in community-engaged research, the Community-Based Research Core (CBRC) provides expertise on development of learning cooperatives; methods for implementation research; and use of information technology to improve the health of communities.

SYNERGY provides funding through its Translational Pilot Program and also guides investigators to funding opportunities administered by other means at Dartmouth



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Academic-Industry Core (A-IC)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The SYNERGY Academic-Industry Core (A-IC) provides institutional support for translational research and fosters industry partnerships to benefit human health by developing the commercial potential of advances in biomedical research, biomedical engineering, health care outcomes research, and other translational efforts. Such services include intellectual property and entrepreneurship education, asset evaluation and development planning, access to both operating and bricks-and-mortar incubators, outreach to industry as well as private (angel/home office) and venture capital investors.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Biomedical Informatics Core (BIC)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Biomedical Informatics Core (BIC) offers clinical and translational investigators support on informatics tools for cohort discovery, data integration, data management, text mining and visual analytics. In addition, the BIC provides consultative services on integration of data systems and on procedures for research data security.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Bioregistry

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Currently under development, the SYNERGY Bioregistry is a centralized virtual biorepository that will integrate information about samples from existing and future biorepositories. The Bioregistry will comprise:

A standardized data warehouse of information on existing research biorepositories at Dartmouth
eSample, a research tool to allow tracking of specimens and integration with the Bioregistry
Access to the Dartmouth "freezer farm" of large freezer storage units to support archived materials

The Bioregistry will enhance access to a diverse array of biologic samples, allowing investigators to manage sample collection and storage based on individual project needs and enabling researchers to learn about existing samples that can be used to pursue new clinical and translational studies.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Biostatistics Consultation Core (BCC)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Biostatistics Consultation provides essential statistical and quantitative methods support to Dartmouth investigators, helping to remove impediments to initiating new clinical translational research programs for young physicians and other scientists. When possible, standardized methods will be used for common designs and analyses. However, the BCC will adopt and apply new techniques as appropriate and form templates that can be easily adapted to new projects, such as specialized power calculations for designs involving measurement error, for which the BCC has developed specialized software.

Services

Statistical design and sample-size calculations for all types of study designs, including clinical trials of all phases; observational studies, including cross-sectional cohort designs, case-control studies, and hybrid designs; family studies; administrative database analyses; and studies of diagnostic test assessment/screening



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Center for Translational Population Research (CTPR)

Type: Center

Summary:

Dartmouth SYNERGY's Center for Translational Population Research (CTPR) provides technical and analytic support for multidisciplinary translational approaches and other innovative uses of large population databases for measuring population health outcomes, costs, and patient goals and experiences. Medicare claims data and other large-scale data sources, which are often linked to Census data or to clinical registries and data from randomized trials, provide insights for measures of long-term health outcomes, costs, and comparative effectiveness.

The work of the CTPR draws upon the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, which uses Medicare data to provide information and analysis about national, regional, and local health care markets and hospitals and their affiliated physicians. This research has helped policymakers, the media, health care analysts, and others improve their understanding of our health care system; it forms the foundation for many current efforts to improve health and health systems across the U.S.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Clinical Research Unit (CRU)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The SYNERGY Clinical Research Unit (CRU) is an outpatient research unit that offers investigators a full array of services for the performance of clinical research. The CRU will be located in Faulkner 4M at DHMC and become fully operational in November 2012. All clinical research, ranging from industry-sponsored, investigator-initiated and multi-center clinical trials are eligible for CRU usage. Trained CRU staff facilitate clinical research and study execution with emphasis on patient safety and research quality. The CRU is available to any Geisel faculty wishing to perform clinical research.

To meet the variety of investigators' needs, we offer a range of services.

Please file a Request Help form to be contacted by the CRU Manager and access CRU support services see
https://synergy.dartmouth.edu/static/docs/cru_lab_form.pdf



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Clinical Trials Office (CTO)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Clinical Trials Office (CTO) supports clinical research study initiation and conduct, including assurance of regulatory and financial compliance. The CTO works to enhance patient safety, promote high-quality research, and create increased standardization and consistency within the overall clinical research enterprise at Dartmouth.

Current responsibilities of the CTO include: clinical trial contract review and negotiation; budget review in collaboration with PI and negotiation with sponsor; financial oversight of the trial with Medicare Coverage Analysis and management of the research billing activities of open trials; regulatory support for investigators, including study monitoring of investigator-initiated trials and registration of studies at clinicaltrials.gov; consistent registration of all new trials in Velos eResearch system prior to study initiation; and education and training for clinical research professionals.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Community-Based Research Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

SYNERGY engages regional communities in collaborative clinical and translational research to improve health and health care. Efforts are founded on extensive experience through the Dartmouth CO‑OP Project, a network of community-based clinicians who have developed and refined the model of practice-based research. The Community-Based Research Core provides regional organizations and communities with access to health status data, research tools, and support.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Ethics Consultation Core (ECC)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Ethics Consultation Core (ECC) leverages current ethics activities across Dartmouth, and thus provides the capacity for real-time collaborative ethics advice for investigators throughout the translational research community.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Recruitment and Retention Core (RCC)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Recruitment and Retention Core (RCC) helps investigators make their studies visible across Dartmouth and to the public to increase awareness of clinical study opportunities.



Dartmouth SYNERGY: Research Design and Epidemiology Core (RDE)

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Services:

Hypothesis framing

Overall study design and methods, including clinical trials, cohort, case-control and hybrid designs

Design of intervention, questionnaires, definition of outcomes and predictor variables

Designing and utilizing disease, screening, and other registries

Biomarker development, including application and testing of innovative technologies

Design of behavioral interventions

Study implementation/protocols

Analytic plans and considerations

Interpretation of results



Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program

Type: Center

Summary:

"The Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the ways in which arsenic and mercury in the environment affect ecosystems and human health. We communicate our results to communities, grass-roots organizations, and state and federal agencies, and we train students to conduct research from both a clinical and community-based perspective. We hope you will be inspired to ask questions about our work, and will learn about the ways these metals may affect your health."

The Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program includes scientists, postdoctoral and graduate students, and technical and support staff from Dartmouth College and Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, New Hampshire. We also collaborate with researchers at other universities and government agencies.

Our Program investigates the ways arsenic and mercury in the environment affect ecosystems and human health. As part of our work, we provide students with opportunities to participate on interdisciplinary research teams, and we communicate our research results to state and federal agencies, and grass-roots organizations. Through the partnerships established between our investigators and our stakeholders, we also create opportunities to engage local communities in our research.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Administrative Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Administrative Core serves as the central organizing framework for the Program and provides fiscal and resource management.

The Administrative Core serves as the central organizing framework for the Program.

In addition, the core provides administrative and liaison support and assists with coordination and facilitation of translation and training core activities.

The Administrative Core also coordinates the activities of the Program's External Advisory Committee, which provides program guidance concerning:
• the scientific merit of our research
• the relevance and importance of the individual components to the goals of the Program
• the integration of research across disciplines
• the effectiveness of research translation activities in linking projects and stakeholders
• the appropriateness of community engagement and training activities.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Community Engagement Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Community engagement refers to bi-directional interaction between community stakeholders and our research program. Authentic bi-directional communication between our program and community members allows us to:

Learn about environmental health concerns in local communities;
Determine how the public prioritizes health risks;
Discover what forms of risk communication are most effective;
Develop materials in response to community needs; and
Keep you informed about our research and upcoming events.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Community Research Translation Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Research Translation Core communicates the Programs' research results in user-friendly formats that will benefit federal and state agencies, non-profits and help grass-roots organizations make informed decisions on issues that affect the health of their communities.

Examples of some of our most recent projects on arsenic and mercury are available on our website. Please contact us if you would like more information on our research, would be interested in discussing a collaboration opportunity, or if you have suggestions for additional ways in which we can reach our stakeholders with information on the ways in which arsenic and mercury impact environmental public health.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Trace Element Analysis Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several “hyphenated” techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.


Our ICP-MS instruments can also be coupled with cold vapor generation, gas and liquid chromatography and laser ablation. With these hyphenated analyses we can:

Detect ultra-low levels of arsenic or mercury (< 10 ng/L for arsenic and < 0.02 ng/L for methylmercury)
Differentiate between toxic and nontoxic forms, or species, of arsenic and mercury
Map trace elements within a biological tissue

We are interested in new methods and new applications for hyphenated analyses such as determination of arsenic species in food using chromatography coupled to ICP-MS and the elemental imaging of biological tissues such as placenta and teeth by laser ablation-ICP-MS.

The TEA lab supports Dartmouth College researchers in the Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program, Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury and the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth.



Dartmouth's Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program Training Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Training Core supports undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral level interdisciplinary training in fields related to environmental health and environmental science and engineering. By enhancing cross-training of students in disciplines not traditionally connected, the core is able to enhance the interdisciplinary nature of the Program.

We organize a range of training activities that help researchers at the beginning of their scientific careers develop into highly motivated, productive, interdisciplinary scientists. See website for details



Dartmouth-Hitchcock Department of Neurology

Type: Department

Summary:

Neurology


Our Neurology Department provides specialized care for a wide range of neurological conditions. Read more about out general neurological services, or learn more about our specialized programs:

ALS Center
Cerebrovascular Disease and Stroke Program
Epilepsy Program
Headache Center
Movement Disorders Program
Multiple Sclerosis Center
Neuromuscular Program
Parkinson's Center
Sleep Services

Ongoing research interests include epilepsy and epilepsy surgery, stroke, headache, movement disorders, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), neuroimmunology, neuropharmacology, neuropsychology, neuroradiology, sleep disorders, memory, dementia and geriatric neurology. Academic activities include clinical and basic science teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels, participation in various interdisciplinary research studies, and publication of research in related academic journals.


Our Services
Contact Us

Our diagnostic services include complete neurologic evaluation, including:

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
Computerized tomography (CT)
Neuromuscular electrophysiology (EMG)
Long-term video and ambulatory EEG monitoring
Lumbar Puncture (LP)
Visual, auditory, somatosensory evoked potentials
Digital subtraction angiography, arteriography and myography, with appropriate neuroradiology support, at the Lebanon campus.

Subspecialty clinics in pediatric neurology, neuro-oncology, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders, headache, stroke, epilepsy, memory and dementia are held at the Lebanon campus. Twenty-six full-time neurologists and nine residents staff the department.

Ongoing research interests include epilepsy and epilepsy surgery, stroke, headache, movement disorders, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), neuroimmunology, neuropharmacology, neuropsychology, neuroradiology, sleep disorders, memory, dementia and geriatric neurology. Academic activities include clinical and basic science teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels, participation in various interdisciplinary research studies, and publication of research in related academic journals.

Neurology is designated a specialty clinic within the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinic system, and appointments are scheduled through physician referral. Telephone inquiries are welcome.



Dartmouth-Hitchcock Epilepsy Center

Type: Center

Summary:

Epilepsy surgery, neurophysiology including intraoperative monitoring, seizures and pregnancy, women's health issues in epilepsy



Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Type: Department

Summary:

Evaluates and treats all digestive health issues, including those of the stomach and esophagus, intestines, liver, gallbladder and pancreas.


We offer services in Concord, Keene, Lebanon, Manchester and Nashua, NH.



Dartmouth-Hitchcock Heart and Vascular Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The Heart & Vascular Research Center (HVRC) conducts a comprehensive research program encompassing basic, pre-clinical and clinical research designed to discover and understand the basic mechanisms underlying blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for treatment and prevention of ischemic heart and vascular diseases. The program integrates research and development efforts in basic molecular and cell biology in conjunction with an extensive animal physiology program which provides a variety of models for testing and analysis of promising small molecules or molecular targets. An ongoing, active and comprehensive clinical program allows immediate testing of promising therapeutic modalities in patients with coronary disease. These activities are supplemented by an imaging program that focuses on physiologic assessment of tissue function and perfusion.



Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC)

Type: Center

Summary:

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) is New Hampshire's only academic medical center. Internationally renowned, nationally ranked, and regionally respected, we integrate high-quality patient care, advanced medical education, and translational research to provide a full spectrum of health care.

DHMC is made up of:

* Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital
* The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinic (a network of more than 1200 primary and specialty care physicians located throughout New Hampshire and Vermont)
* Dartmouth Medical School
* Veterans Affairs Regional Medical and Office Center in White River Junction, VT.

The Dartmouth-Hitchcock health care system includes hundreds of physicians, specialists, and other providers who work together at different locations to meet the health care needs of patients in Northern New England. In addition to primary care services at local community practices, Dartmouth-Hitchcock patients have access to specialists in almost every area of medicine, as well as world-class research at Dartmouth Medical School and centers such as the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice.



Dartmouth-Hitchock Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Type: Department

Summary:

Dartmouth-Hitchock Gastroenterology and Hepatology evaluates and treats all digestive health issues, including those of the stomach and esophagus, intestines, liver, gallbladder and pancreas.

We offer services in Concord, Keene, Lebanon, Manchester and Nashua, NH.



DePuy, Johnson & Johnson, Joint Medical Products

Type: Consortium

Summary:

2386 Hip related devices
3169 Knee related devices



Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College

Type: Academic Department



Department of Community and Family Medicine

Type: Department

Summary:

Highlights

FACULTY: Two-thirds community-based; one-third DHMC campus-based.

EDUCATION
MEDICAL STUDENTS: (Required Courses)

On Doctoring: A Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE) Years I&II (4 hours per week throughout)
Epidemiology/Biostatistics Year I - 36 hours
Family Practice Clerkship Year III - 8 weeks
Health, Society and the Physician Year IV - 5 weeks (60% time)

RESIDENTS:

Maine-Dartmouth Family Practice Residency - Augusta/Waterville (31 residents, 3 Geriatric Fellows and 2 Sports Medicine Fellows)
New Hampshire-Dartmouth Family Practice Residencies (24 residents and 6 Preventive Medicine Residents)
DHMC Leadership Preventive Medicine Residency (24)

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT:

New Hampshire Area Health Education Center
Dartmouth Primary Care Cooperative Project (Dartmouth COOP): An effective and productive alliance for coordinated primary care research /teaching throughout Northern New England
Office of Community-Based Research and Education (OCER): Regional Workshops and Technical Assistance

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS

MPH, MS, PhD with Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice
MD/MBA, MPH/MBA, Clinical Fellows/MBA, PhD/MBA with Tuck School of Business
PhD in Quantitative Biological Sciences with Genetics

RESEARCH
2008 - 2009 Annual Sponsored Activities Budget $38.5 Million (Direct Costs only). Includes awards either administered by C&FM or for which PI's primary appointment is in C&FM.

Educational
Epidemiology and Biostatistics (joint with Cancer Center, Environmental Studies and other clinical departments)
Primary Care Research (including Prevention, Aging, and Medical Home development)
Mental Health Services Research (joint with Psychiatry)
Interactive Media Lab
Nursing Research
Health Services Research/Outcomes (joint with Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice)

PATIENT CARE

Primary care provided under Dartmouth Hitchcock Clinic: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Women's Health, Sports Medicine
Primary care provided by community-based faculty throughout Northern New England.
Administrative Leadership and staffing of Dartmouth Hitchcock Regional Primary Care Center

SELECTED RECOGNITIONS

Family Medicine Clerkship - ranked by students as one of the best Dartmouth Medical School required clerkship experiences for over ten years.
As a group, DMS students' scores are higher in the field of Preventive Medicine (National Boards, Part II) than in any other field.
Largest sponsored research budget of any such department in the nation.
Ten department faculty (full and part-time) have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine (Batalden, Daulaire, Dietrich, Fisher, Jemison, Koop, Rosenthal, Skinner, Wennberg, Zubkoff)

Department cited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education as "an outstanding example of excellence in academic pursuits and community-based teaching, made all the more prominent by its wide ranging nationally recognized research programs...a resource for faculty from other sectors of the Medical School."



Department of Defense

Type: Government Agency

Summary:

The mission of the Department of Defense is to provide the military forces needed to deter war and to protect the security of our country. The department's headquarters is at the Pentagon.



Department of Epidemiology at Geisel School of Medicine and Dartmouth College

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

The Department of Epidemiology provides the Geisel School of Medicine and Dartmouth College an internationally ranking, state-of-the-art department with excellence in research, teaching and service in the field of epidemiology.

The Department of Epidemiology will advance the field of epidemiology by fostering highly interdisciplinary research programs with a translational emphasis, and a broad range of educational activities. Epidemiology promotes discovery of disease etiology and progression through rigorously constructed hypothesis-driven clinical trials and population-based research. Additionally, Epidemiology concomitantly derives and applies novel methodologies in these contexts to advance public health and translational medicine. Our faculty expertise spans diverse areas in molecular-genetic epidemiology, epigenetics, nutritional and chemoprevention research, cancer etiology, environmental epidemiology, pharmacoepidemiology, women's and children's health, diseases of aging, global health, medical imaging, disease and screening registries, and epidemiologic methods.



Department of Homeland Security

Type: Government Agency

Summary:

The Department of Homeland Security has a vital mission: to secure the nation from the many threats we face. This requires the dedication of more than 230,000 employees in jobs that range from aviation and border security to emergency response, from cybersecurity analyst to chemical facility inspector. Our duties are wide-ranging, but our goal is clear - keeping America safe.



Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Darmouth College

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

The discipline of Pharmacology from Greek, pharmakon is an applied science combining medicine, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, biology and immunology. Specifically, it is the study of interactions that occur between living cells, systems and organisms and natural or synthetic chemicals that affect normal or abnormal functions. This field encompasses drug target discovery, drug composition, interactions, therapeutics and toxicology. Recently, scientists have made enormous progress in the identification of many novel drug targets for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. The goal of our Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology is to continue this progress by providing the intellectual and physical environment to foster discovery and translation.



Department of Physics: Apparatus Shop Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory



Department of Physiology and Neurobiology

Type: Academic Department



Department of Radiology, Dartmouth College

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Radiology departments provide the full range of medical imaging and image-guided procedures services, including routine X-rays, diagnostic exams, fluoroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, nuclear imaging, and interventional radiology treatments, as well as rapidly developing software technologies such as 3D imaging.



Discovery Dartmouth Initiative for SuperCOmputing Ventures in Education and Research

Type: Center

Summary:

Discovery is a 2600+ core Linux HPC cluster available to the Dartmouth community, Geisel School of Medicine and DHMC.

The cluster is comprised of both AMD and Intel processors. Nodes range from 8 processor cores and 32GB of memory to 48 processor cores and 192GB of memory. In total the cluster has 9.4TB of memory and 200TB of disk space delivered by a Isilon storage cluster. Many of the compute nodes are interconnected via a high-speed InfiniBand network. For more information on the node specs please visit the cluster details page

Discovery is built on CentOS 6 and contains ‘C’ and FORTRAN compilers as well as third party applications.

Job submissions on Discovery are submitted to a moab/torque scheduling system. This system allows for more equitable allocation of resources and optimizes cpu usage.

Discovery accepts SSH, SFTP or clients that use these protocols to connect.

  • To get started using Discovery all you need to do is request an account via Discovery’s account request form here


  • We encourage research groups who have compute-intensive applications to reach out and see what Discovery can offer. For questions please email research.computing@dartmouth.edu.



    Dunlap and Loros Laboratories

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our laboratories and research are directed towards understanding the mechanism by which eukaryotic organisms keep time on a daily basis, and how this capacity to keep time is used to regulate metabolism and development. Circadian clocks with fundamentally identical characteristics are found in all groups of eukaryotic organisms, but the uses to which these clock are put reflects the diversity of evolution. Phylogenetically this ranges from the control of cell division and enzyme activities in unicells, to a firmly established involvement in plant and animal photoperiodism and in avian and insect celestial navigation, to multiplicity of human systems including endocrine function, work-rest cycles and sleep, and drug tolerances and effectiveness. Cell division in many tissues and organs within the human body is regulated on a daily basis by the clock, providing the theoretical basis for chronotherapy of cancer, and manipulation of internal circadian rhythms provides treatments for several kinds of sleep and affective disorders. The general layout of the feedback loop that makes up the clock and the identity molecular identity of some of the components, particularly the heterodimeric positive elements WC-1 and WC-2 that serve as positive elements in the loop, appear to be conserved among the Crown Eukaryotes (Dunlap Science 280, 1548-49, 1998; Cell 96, 271-290, 1999).



    EPR Center for the Study of Viable Systems

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    The EPR Center for the Study of Viable Systems at Dartmouth College is a biomedical research center with a strong focus on both experimental and clinical applications of in vivo Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), a technique for measuring unpaired electrons whose basis is similar in nature to that of MRI. The Center is part of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and the Norris Cotton Cancer Center. The Center is involved in the development, improvement, and application of EPR techniques that can be used for studies in vivo in small animals (e.g. mice and rats), larger animals (e.g. pigs), and human subjects.



    Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    Type: Consortium

    Summary:

    The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) was established in 1955 as one of the first cooperative groups launched to perform multi-center cancer clinical trials. A cooperative group is a large network of researchers, physicians, and health care professionals at public and private institutions across the country who are members of the group. Funded primarily by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), ECOG has evolved from a five member consortium of institutions on the East Coast to one of the largest clinical cancer research organizations in the U.S. with almost 6000 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, statisticians, and clinical research associates (CRAs) from the U.S., Canada, and South Africa. Institutional members include universities, medical centers, Community Clinical Oncology Programs (CCOPs), and Cooperative Group Outreach Programs (CGOPs). These institutions work toward the common goal of controlling, effectively treating, and ultimately curing cancer. Research results are provided to the world-wide medical community through scientific publications and professional meetings.

    Currently, ECOG has more than 90 active clinical trials in all types of adult malignancies. Annual accrual is 6,000 patients, with more than 20,000 patients in follow-up.



    Eastman Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research projects in Dr. Eastman's laboratory are focused on preclinical development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic strategies, using primarily established drugs in combination with novel therapeutic agents. Cancer cell lines exhibit very variable responses to these strategies, so it is predicted tumors will also have variable response such that some will be highly sensitive. The goal therefore is to define the mechanisms of sensitivity and develop clinical trials targeted to patients with sensitive tumors.



    Enelow Microbiology and Immunology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Immunopathogenesis of respiratory virus infection., Inflammatory and immune-mediated lung disease., Influenza pathogenesis.



    Environmental Protection Agency

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    Born in the wake of elevated concern about environmental pollution, EPA was established on December 2, 1970 to consolidate in one agency a variety of federal research, monitoring, standard-setting and enforcement activities to ensure environmental protection. Since its inception, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people.



    Fejes-Toth Physiology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The major research interest of Dr. Náray-Fejes-Tóth is the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which steroid hormones regulate kidney function and blood pressure.



    Fiering Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    This lab investigates the function of various cis-regulatory DNA elements in controlling transcription during mammalian development. Our present focus is on the beta-globin locus and in particular, how expression of one gene at the locus suppresses expression of other nearby genes.

    We are also interested in mouse models of cancer and are developing novel mouse models. The influence of tobacco smoke exposure on the innate immune system is another area of research in the lab.



    Galton Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine



    Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

    Type: School

    Summary:

    The Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, founded in 1797, strives to improve the lives of the people it serves: students, patients, and local and global communities. The School builds healthier communities through innovations in research, education, and patient care. As one of America's top medical schools, the Geisel School of Medicine is committed to creating physician leaders who will help solve our most vexing challenges in healthcare.



    Genomics and Molecular Biology (GMB)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Microarray and Next-Gen Sequencing Section provides technologies that enable profiling of gene expression, miRNA, GpC Island, and CGH on a whole-genome scale, and provides high-quality genomics and microarray data. (see link below)

    The Molecular Biology Section provides DNA fragment analysis qPCR, Sanger sequencing and NanoString Technology. (see link below)



    Geospatial Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The GeoSpatial Resource Supports geospatial analysis by providing expert consultation and collaboration for research projects in behavior, epidemiology, health services, and other disciplines.

    For more detailed information see http://cancer.dartmouth.edu/documents/pdf/shared_resources_march2012.pdf listed below as a website.



    Gerngross Nanoparticle Targeting Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Nanoparticle targeting focuses on using magnetic nanoparticles to destroy malignant tumors.



    Gladfelter Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    We study how the cell cycle evolved to function in multinucleated cells. Single cells with many nuclei are found in bones and muscles, in fungal pathogens and in many cancers. We use two evolutionarily related fungi, the uninucleated budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) and a filamentous, multinucleated fungus (A. gossypii) to identify how the cell cycle machinery may have diverged to support accurate division within the spatial requirements of a multinucleated cell. These two related organisms are an excellent pair for such studies because while the genomes share about 95% of the same genes, approximately 100 million years have passed since their common ancestor allowing for significant divergence between homologues. We employ a broad range of experimental approaches including in vivo timelapse microscopy, cell biology, mathematical modeling, biochemistry and genetics to explore how cell cycle networks direct nuclear division within the unique geometry found in cells where many nuclei share one cytoplasm.



    Green Microbiology and Immunology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The primary interests of the lab focus on cell-mediated immunity to mouse retroviruses that cause either leukemia or immunodeficiency.



    Heart and Vascular Center

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    "Cardiovascular disease" describes diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Such diseases affect the heart's ability to function normally, and are the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Some cardiovascular conditions are present at birth (congenital), while others develop over time.
    The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Heart and Vascular Center offers a wide range of heart and vascular services at multiple locations throughout New Hampshire.

    The Center is comprised of the following sections:

    * Cardiology Teams
    * Cardiothoracic Surgery Team
    * Pediatric Cardiology Team
    * Vascular and Interventional Radiology Team
    * Vascular Surgery Team



    Heart and Vascular Research Center, Dartmouth College

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    The Heart & Vascular Research Center (HVRC) conducts a comprehensive research program encompassing basic, pre-clinical and clinical research designed to discover and understand the basic mechanisms underlying blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for treatment and prevention of ischemic heart and vascular diseases. The program integrates research and development efforts in basic molecular and cell biology in conjunction with an extensive animal physiology program which provides a variety of models for testing and analysis of promising small molecules or molecular targets. An ongoing, active and comprehensive clinical program allows immediate testing of promising therapeutic modalities in patients with coronary disease. These activities are supplemented by an imaging program that focuses on physiologic assessment of tissue function and perfusion.

    This comprehensive approach to the study of coronary angiogenesis has already allowed Center investigators to discover and test a number of unique molecules which play an important role in the control of heart vessel development, to develop several novel animal models of cardiac angiogenesis, and to organize and conduct the first Phase I/II clinical trial of coronary angiogenesis in the United States.

    The HVRC staff includes 8 faculty members and 21 post-doctoral fellows, research associates and graduate students. The Center maintains close research links with Sections of Cardiology, Vascular Surgery and the Department of Radiology with faculty and fellows in these Departments playing an active and important role in the Center's activities. In addition, many research activities include close collaborations with Dr. Mark Post's laboratory at the University of Maastricht.

    The HVRC activities are supported by a number of grants from the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, private foundations and research agreements with biomedical and pharmaceutical companies.

    The HVRC maintains a regular series of Vascular Biology Seminars and Work in Progress (WIP) meetings.



    Hitchcock Foundation

    Type: Foundation

    Summary:

    The mission of the Hitchcock Foundation is "to aid and advance the study and investigation of human ailments and injuries, and the causes, prevention, relief, and cure thereof, and the study and investigation of problems of hygiene, health and public welfare, and the promotion of medical, surgical and scientific learning, skill, education and investigation, and to engage in and conduct and to aid and assist in medical, surgical and scientific research in the broadest sense."



    Hogan Lab

    Type: Laboratory



    Hood Center for Children and Families

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    The Hood Center for Children and Families was established at Dartmouth in 1990 with support from the Charles H. Hood Foundation. The Hood Center is dedicated to improving the well-being of children, adolescents, and families through health promotion research and family-centered support. Our research and projects focus on the impact of media on teen smoking; obesity prevention; the management of chronic health conditions in children and its impact on families; and the impact of prenatal and early life exposures on adult health outcomes.



    Host-Pathogen Interactions Core

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    With support from the NCRR COBRE Program Project and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Research Development Program, the Lung Biology Center offers a Host-Pathogen Interactions Core:

    The goals of the Host-Pathogen Interaction Core are to:

    1) Facilitate research on biological mechanisms that contribute to lung disease. The infrastructure and expertise of the Core supports basic science studies, including protein localization and trafficking, gene regulation and microbial co-culture experiments.

    2) Accelerate therapeutic development. The Core allows investigators to build on basic studies to facilitate drug discovery and preclinical investigations, thereby directly enhancing the translational impact of COBRE-affiliated groups. The Core also provides expertise to biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies developing new therapies to treat lung disease.



    Immune Monitoring and Flow Cytometry Resource (IMFC)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    DartLab is a Shared Resource that is used both by basic scientists and by clinicians carrying out mechanistic studies for clinical trials. Services are also available to non-Dartmouth clients. The consolidated Shared Resource moves beyond the simple provisioning of technical services to making complex experiments possible by providing scientific and technological support for implementing advanced, high-complexity assays in a cost-effective way, and by providing a mechanism for the acquisition of new methodologies.

    We carry out a spectrum of immunoassays and can develop customized immunoassays to suit your studies. We provide dedicated instruments for your use including cell sorters, flow cytometers, an ELISPOT reader, a Bio-Plex array reader and a Sector Imager, an autoMACS and a Robosep.
    Whole Blood Services

    * Flow Cytometry
    * Whole blood processing
    * Cell Subset Enrichment
    * Education
    * Clinical Trial Studies



    Informatics Collaboratory for Design, Development and Dissemination (ic3d)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The mission of the Informatics Collaboratory for Design, Development and Dissemination (ic3d), or the Informatics Collaboratory, is to advance biomedical discovery and healthcare delivery through novel computational tools and information technologies.

    To achieve this mission, the members of the Informatics Collaboratory seek excellence and leadership in:

    Fostering collaborative engagement with the healthcare and biomedical research community to effectively use informatics in system design, decision-making, problem solving and scientific inquiry

    Advancing innovative research on theories, methods and tools for generating, modeling, managing, analyzing, and interpreting biomedical data and knowledge

    Providing interdisciplinary education that enables students and professionals to undertake scholarly work in biomedical informatics, ranging from algorithm development to socio-technical studies


    twitter #ic3dDartmouth



    Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection I3P

    Type: Consortium

    Summary:

    The Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection—the I3P—is a national consortium of leading academic institutions, national laboratories and non-profit research organizations. Since its founding in 2002, the I3P has been a cornerstone in the coordination of cyber security research and development. The I3P brings together researchers, government officials, and industry representatives to address cyber security challenges affecting the nation’s critical infrastructures.
    Drawing from its member institutions, the I3P assembles multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional research teams able to bring in-depth analysis to complex and pressing problems. Research outcomes are shared at I3P-sponsored workshops, professional conferences and in peer-reviewed journals, as well as via technology transfer to end-users. The I3P also supports programs to promote education and public awareness.



    Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences (iQBS)

    Type: Institute

    Summary:

    The iQBS was established in July of 2010 to develop, advance and support interdisciplinary education, research and infrastructure in the quantitative biomedical sciences including bioengineering, bioinformatics, biophysics, biostatistics, computational biology, epidemiology, mathematical biology and related areas.



    Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (ISTS) at Dartmouth College

    Type: Institute

    Summary:

    The Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (ISTS) at Dartmouth College is dedicated to pursuing research and education to advance information security and privacy throughout society.

    ISTS engages in interdisciplinary research, education and outreach programs that focus on information technology (IT) and its role in society, particularly the impact of IT in security and privacy broadly conceived. ISTS nurtures leaders and scholars, educates students and the community, and collaborates with its partners to develop and deploy IT, and to better understand how IT relates to socio-economic forces, cultural values and political influences. ISTS research improves our ability to:

    Design and deploy secure, usable computer systems and protect them from tampering, disruption and attack
    Enable people and organizations to communicate and exchange information securely and privately across networked computing devices
    Address social, economic and policy issues that arise in the development, deployment and regulation of such information technology

    Goals of ISTS

    RESEARCH, to extend knowledge and provide insight and innovation in the area of information security
    EDUCATION, to increase the number of students and faculty involved in technology research, and to increase community awareness of privacy and security challenges and solutions related to IT
    OUTREACH, through collaborations that deploy technology and encourage knowledge transfer for both public and private benefit



    Irradiation, Pre-clinical Imaging, and Microscopy (IPIM)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Irradiation Resource (see link) assists investigators in radiation treatment planning and delivery of ionizing irradiation to cells, rodents, large animals and spontaneous animal tumors. Pre-clinical Imaging provides technologies for non-invasive, whole-animal imgaing of rodents used in preclinical research studies.

    The Microscopy Section (see link ) provides access to point scanning confocal microscopy, conventional bright field and flourescence light microscopy, and image analysis resources. The facility provides individual and group training for operation of the light microscopes



    Irradiation, Preclinical Imaging, & Microscopy (IPIM) Shared Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    We have expanded the previous NCCC Irradiation Shared Resource (137Cs irradiator and 6-18 MeV linear accelerator) to include Optical Cellular Microscopy (Confocal Microscopy) and Electron Microscopy, as well as state-of-the-art Preclinical Imaging (large and small animal). The new resource now is called the Irradiation, Preclinical Imaging, & Microscopy (IPIM) Shared Resource. The IPIM mission is to use these facilities to support investigators in solving basic and clinical cancer research questions. It is also our goal to promote NCCC investigator awareness of these facilities and to continue to provide the most sophisticated and relevant technologies to NCCC and associated investigators. All resource staff are committed individually to the generation of the highest quality and most meaningful results through personalized instruction and support of each project.



    Israel Genetics Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    On Id2 and Id4 - genes involved in embryo development and cancer, mouse models for the development and malignancy of brain tumors.



    Kinlaw Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our research seeks to understand the peculiar metabolic needs of tumors, and how they adjust to them, with an eye toward exploiting tumor metabolism in the clinic. We have recently focused on the “addiction” of tumors, including breast cancers, to a supply of fatty acids. This has led to insights related to the regulation of lipid synthesis in tumors, and the ability to target it in preclinical systems and clinical trials. We recently found that tumors may not only synthesize fatty acids, but may also take them up from diet-derived lipoprotein particles in the circulation. Our laboratory has developed unique reagents to study these pathways, including novel antibodies and genetically engineered mice. We have also consistently focused on studies aimed to establish the relevance of our findings to actual human tumors, including breast and prostate cancers, sarcomas, and lymphomas, and are involved in clinical trials of the use of unusual fatty acids to manipulate these pathways inpatients. 0
    Hanover NH 03755



    Kisselev Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Kisselev laboratory works on fundamental and translational aspects of proteasome pharmacology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Proteins in all living cells are constitutively synthesized and degraded. The 26S proteasome is a large (2.5MDa) ATP-dependent proteolytic machine, which is responsible for the majority of protein degradation in mammalian cells. The majority of its substrates are damaged and misfolded proteins. Cancer cells, especially those which produce large amounts of proteins (e.g., antibody-secreting multiple myeloma cells), generate excessive amounts of abnormal proteins resulting in a high load on proteasome in these cells and making cancer cells highly sensitive to proteasome inhibitors. Peptide boronate inhibitor of proteasome Velcade (bortezomib) is being used for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, and five other proteasome inhibitors are now undergoing clinical trials.



    Leib Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Immunology Program, Molecular Pathogenesis Program, Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Programs



    Lewis Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory



    Live Cell Imaging Core

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    With support from the NCRR COBRE Program Project and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Research Development Program, the Lung Biology Center offers the following core services.

    The goal of the Live Cell Imaging Core is to facilitate research on biological mechanisms that contribute to lung disease and to accelerate efforts to identify candidate therapeutic targets. The infrastructure and expertise of the Core supports live cell imaging, as well as protein localization and host-microbe interaction studies.



    Mathematical Biostatistics and Image Analysis Laboratory (MBIAL)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The goal of the Mathematical Biostatistics and Image Analysis Laboratory (MBIAL) is to develop mathematical and biostatistical methods for the analysis of medical images and shapes. Other areas of interest include mixed models, sample size and power calculations, asymptotic hypothesis tests comparison, optimization in statistics, image reconstruction, inverse problems, financial mathematics, partial differential equations and tumor response to treatment.



    Micro/Immuno & Pathology Departments, Dartmouth College

    Type: Academic Department



    Micro/Immuno Department, Dartmouth College

    Type: Academic Department



    Microarray and Next-Gen Sequencing Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Genomics Shared Resource provides technologies to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and Dartmouth community investigators that enable profiling of gene expression, miRNA, GpC Island, and CGH on a whole-genome scale. The long-term goal of the Genomics Shared Resource is to provide an efficient and affordable fee-for-service operation that will provide high quality genomics and microarray data for the growing number of Cancer Center investigators who require this service.



    Microscopy Shared Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Microscopy Shared Resource strives to provide reliable and affordable access to point scanning confocal microscopy, conventional bright field and fluorescence light microscopy, and image analysis resources. The facility provides individual and group training for operation of the light microscopes. Training is intended to provide an understanding of the basic light microscopy and digital imaging principles involved. Training for our microscope use and imaging consultation is open to all members of Dartmouth College, Geisel School of Medicine, DHMC, and outside users.

    Capabilities

    The Facility Manager provides free personalized training for operation of all microscopes and software in the facility. A two-hour introduction to digital imaging, confocal and two-photon microscopy is offered 5-6 times a year. Additional hands-on confocal training is provided as part of our program to qualify users for independent use and 24/7 access to the Zeiss LSM510 confocal microscope. Troubleshooting of problems or alignment issues on investigator microscopes is also available at no charge.

    The Facility Manager is available to work with investigators using the microscopes at an additional hourly cost. Please contact Ken Orndorff-Facility Manager to consult prior to performing specimen labeling and mounting.
    Usage

    Consultation and advice for specimen preparation and fluorophore choice is available on request.

    Only fully trained and authorized users will be able to see confocal schedule. All microscopes accessed 24/7 for trained users. Contact for fee schedule: Kenneth.A.Orndorff@Dartmouth.edu



    Miller Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research in the Miller Laboratory focuses on the translational application of knowledge of cell signaling pathways to therapeutics for breast cancer. Our work spans the spectrum of basic cancer biology, through translational studies in mouse models and human tissues, and interfaces with clinical trials. We use an array of methods and technologies both in our lab and through interaction with core facilities, including mammalian tissue culture, molecular analyses of gene and protein expression, gene expression microarrays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, next-generation DNA sequencing, bioinformatics, protein microarrays, mass spectrometry, mouse models, and live animal imaging.



    Molecular Biology Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    This core facility provides molecular biology products, services, and support to help investigators solve their basic, translational, and clinical research problems. Our services include DNA fragment analysis, qPCR, Sanger sequencing and NanoString Technology. It is our goal to offer the highest quality products and services possible in the most cost effective manner.



    Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Dartmouth College

    Type: Academic Department



    Moseley Biochemistry Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    We study the basic mechanisms that coordinate cell growth and division. At the heart of this coordination are signaling pathways that link cell polarity proteins with the core cell cycle machinery. We use a multi-disciplinary approach to identify these pathways, and then to understand how their activities are controlled by changes in cell size and shape. As many of these proteins are found at distinct sites in the plasma membrane, we have also become interested in the organizational principles that generate discrete compartments at the cell cortex. For this work, we use fission yeast cells as a model system because they allow us to combine a wide range of genetic, genomic, biochemical, and microscopy techniques. In addition, the basic cell polarity and cell cycle systems are well conserved between fission yeast and human cells, where they have important links to the generation of cancer.



    Mulligan-Kehoe Vascular Research Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Heart and Vascular, Angiogenesis



    Mullins Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms that govern T cell infiltration of metastatic cancers. We translate our basic research findings into novel therapies that induce or augment immune cell infiltration of refractory tumors, thereby enhancing the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy.



    Multimodal Neuroimaging Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research Interests
    Biomedical imaging; functional neuroimaging; physiological modeling; heart rate variability; stroke recovery; Alzheimer's disease

    Current Research Projects

    Biomagnetometer instrument development
    Clinical optical-electric probes
    Functional biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease
    Neurosimulator for electroencephalography
    Neurovascular coupling
    Wireless neural probes



    NCIC Clinical Trials Group

    Type: Funding Organization

    Summary:

    The NCIC Clinical Trials Group is a cooperative oncology group which carries out clinical trials in cancer therapy, supportive care and prevention across Canada and internationally. It is one of the national programmes and networks of the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute (CCSRI), and is supported by the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS).



    National Cancer Institute (NCI)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is one of 11 agencies that compose the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The NCI, established under the National Cancer Institute Act of 1937, is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. The National Cancer Act of 1971 broadened the scope and responsibilities of the NCI and created the National Cancer Program. Over the years, legislative amendments have maintained the NCI authorities and responsibilities and added new information dissemination mandates as well as a requirement to assess the incorporation of state-of-the-art cancer treatments into clinical practice.



    National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The NIBIB is an Institute within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) devoted to merging the physical and biological sciences to develop new technologies that improve health. Our goal is to accelerate the pace of discovery and speed the development of biomedical technologies that prevent illnesses or treat them when they do strike.

    Created December 29, 2000, the NIBIB is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), within the Department of Health and Human Services; the Federal government’s premier biomedical research agency. NIBIB-supported research brings advances in fields ranging from physics to nanotechnology to bear on the challenges of diagnosing, preventing and treating disease. Ultimately, the NIBIB seeks to translate research findings from the laboratory to the patient to improve quality of life and reduce the burden of disease. Health care and technology have long been linked in the United States. Today, cardiac pacemakers, mammograms, sustained-release medications, and artificial hips are but a few examples of how biomedical imaging and bioengineering are transforming health care.



    National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), located in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, is one of 27 research institutes and centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (http://www.nih.gov/) , U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (http://www.dhhs.gov/) . The mission of the NIEHS is to reduce the burden of human illness and disability by understanding how the environment influences the development and progression of human disease.



    National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    We are dedicated to improving the health and health care of Americans through the funding of nursing research and research training. Our mission is to promote and improve the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations. This mission is accomplished through support of research in a number of science areas. Among those areas of research are chronic and acute diseases, health promotion and maintenance, symptom management, health disparities, caregiving, self-management, and the end of life. NINR also supports the training of new investigators who bring new ideas and help to further expand research programs. The ultimate goal of our research is its dissemination into clinical practice and into the daily lives of individuals and families.



    National Institute on Aging (NIA)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    Since 1974, the NIA -- one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of the NIH -- has been at the forefront of the Nation's research activities dedicated to understanding the nature of aging, supporting the health and well being of older adults, and extending healthy, active years of life for more people.



    National Institutes of Health (NIH)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services External Web Site Policy , is the nation’s medical research agency—making important discoveries that improve health and save lives.

    NIH’s mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.

    NIH is the largest source of funding for medical research in the world, creating hundreds of thousands of high-quality jobs by funding thousands of scientists in universities and research institutions in every state across America and around the globe.

    NIH is made up of 27 Institutes and Centers, each with a specific research agenda, often focusing on particular diseases or body systems. NIH leadership plays an active role in shaping the agency's research planning, activities, and outlook.



    National Science Foundation (NSF)

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 'to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…' With an annual budget of about $6.9 billion (FY 2010), we are the funding source for approximately 20 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.



    National Security Agency

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS) is home to America's codemakers and codebreakers. The National Security Agency has provided timely information to U.S. decision makers and military leaders for more than half a century. The Central Security Service was established in 1972 to promote a full partnership between NSA and the cryptologic elements of the armed forces.



    Neukom Institute

    Type: Institute

    Summary:

    The Neukom Institute for Computational Science was created to become a catalyst for interdisciplinary collaboration at Dartmouth using computational science to aid the myriad research projects on campus.



    Neuroscience Center at Dartmouth

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    The establishment of the Neuroscience Center at Dartmouth (NCD) in 2002 has produced a new and unique interdisciplinary group whose mission is to foster collaborative and interactive research and education in the neurosciences. The NCD draws from the strengths in three key areas: Clinical, Cognitive & Behavioral, and Molecular/Cellular/Systems Neuroscience. It is the vision of its researchers to produce and disseminate new knowledge, and in doing so train and educate the next generation of neuroscientists. The NCD Advisory Board assists with the Center's initiatives and goals. Over 100 faculty members from 18 departments participate, encompassing the College of Arts and Sciences, Dartmouth Medical School, the Thayer School of Engineering. The research facilities are located in Hanover, NH, Lebanon, NH (Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) and the Veteran Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vt. Research interests comprise a broad range of studies within the neurosciences and provide a wide range of research opportunities for students. In addition, the NCD augments the education of residents and fellow at the clinical level who have academic neuroscience interests.



    New Hampshire Grid

    Type: Extension unit

    Summary:

    The NH-INBRE Grid is funded by NH-INBRE. NH-INBRE is a biomedical/behavioral research collaborative for 2 year and 4 year colleges for New Hampshire. DMS/UNH and 10 partners are part of the research collaborative.

    The NH-INBRE computing vision comes from Dr. Jason Moore who conceived of and funded the Discovery Supercomputer Cluster at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College. The installation of computers at the institutions are an extension of that vision that is being implemented throughout the states (COBRE/INBRE funding) of New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont.

    We would like to acknowledge the generous institutional support from the Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences (iQBS) and the Neukom Institute for Computational Sciences at Dartmouth College.



    Norris Cotton Cancer Center (NCCC)

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center is one of the nation's premier facilities for cancer treatment and research. It is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States.

    The Cancer Center provides a positive environment for treatment, cure, and recovery for patients with all forms of cancer. Patients receive technologically advanced cancer treatments and access to clinical trials of new treatments. Each patient is seen as an individual, and a specific treatment plan is developed by specialists who work directly with the patient, family, and referring physician. The Cancer Center is also a leader in improving the comfort and quality of life of patients.

    Norris Cotton Cancer Center combines advanced
    cancer research at The Geisel School of Medicine
    at Dartmouth with patient-centered cancer care
    at Dartmouth-Hitchcock.



    Office of Clinical Research (OCR)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The Office of Clinical Research (OCR) provides the necessary components for conducting high-quality clinical cancer research.

    The OCR provides support for clinical trials initiated by Dartmouth investigators, as well as industrially sponsored studies and cooperative group studies. The OCR participates in the following cooperative groups:

    Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (ALLIANCE), which includes:
    American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG)
    Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)
    North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG)

    NRG which includes:
    Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)
    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)
    National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project
    (NSABP)

    Children's Oncology Group (COG)

    Cancer immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN)

    Data management activities are focused around existing disease-specific clinical teams. Support is available for data collection, nursing, and pharmacy needs related to clinical research.

    In addition to data management support, the OCR also coordinates the review of cancer-related clinical trials by committees that consider issues of scientific merit, ethics, safety, and patient accrual



    Office of Undergraduate Advising & Research

    Type: Division

    Summary:

    The Office of Undergraduate Advising & Research (UGAR) is the arm of the Dean of Faculty office that oversees advising and research within the undergraduate curriculum. We support faculty in their roles as academic advisors and intellectual mentors to students and help students negotiate the myriad of academic opportunities in and out of the classroom. In keeping with Dartmouth’s core values of 'academic excellence' and 'independence of thought within a culture of collaboration,' UGAR promotes advising and research across campus as these foster the individualization of students’ academic exploration and intellectual growth."

    Programs include:

    * Presidential Scholars
    * Sophomore Science Scholarships
    * Research Grants
    * Senior Fellowships
    * Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships
    * E.E. Just Program
    * Women in Science Project
    * "The Sophomore Year



    PRC

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    The PRC conducts interdisciplinary research on services for individuals who have mental illness. The PRC specializes in developing effective interventions under research conditions, then translating these interventions into actual mental health service and addiction treatment practices and evaluating their effectiveness in routine practice settings. PRC research incorporates multiple scientific perspectives, such as clinical, economic, and ethnographic. The PRC works with efficacy and services researchers to address the needs of multiple stakeholders through effectiveness research in routine practice settings. The major fields of research conducted at the PRC include addiction health services, dual diagnosis, implementation, IPS supported employment, shared decision-making, and technology.

    The PRC was established in 1987 with initial research in New Hampshire focused on integrating case management and substance abuse services, and on integrating vocational and mental health services. In the early 1990s, the PRC expanded beyond New Hampshire and replicated its earlier findings through research in urban settings in Connecticut and Washington, DC. In the late 1990s, the PRC developed new research areas; further developed existing programs; enhanced economics, statistics, and data management capacity; developed a greater number of research collaborations around the country; and enhanced junior faculty support and training. Today, the PRC’s staff are involved in various capacities (e.g., investigators, consultants, trainers) in many states. Our current projects are listed here.



    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are dedicated to addressing the most intractable problems in energy, the environment and national security. Located in Richland, Washington, PNNL is one among ten U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories managed by DOE's Office of Science.



    Pathology Shared Resource (PSR)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our mission is to facilitate project planning, clinical validation and implementation of novel translational technology and research in the fields of molecular diagnostics, molecular therapeutics, pharmacogenomics, quantitative morphologic image analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a CLIA-certified, CAP-accredited laboratory ensuring optimal clinical quality assurance. This past year, the TRL expanded its physical footprint by moving all the histology services to a 5th floor research module in order to reorganize and expand the molecular biology and imaging services in the 6th floor lab.



    Pogue Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Biomedical optics and lasers; medical imaging; image guided spectroscopy of cancer; photodynamic therapy; modeling of tumor pathophysiology and contrast



    Population Health Laboratory (PHL)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The goal of the Population Health Laboratory (PHL) is to promote access to cancer care, including screening, treatment, and surveillance. We believe that how and where care is received influences treatment and outcomes. We also believe that early intervention affects patients’ health and health care experiences. As part of the New Hampshire Mammography Network, the PHL focuses on population-based approaches to optimizing breast cancer screening practices. The PHL is also active with the New Hampshire Colonoscopy Registry research team. The PHL has a special interest in how cancer care resources are allocated across populations, and how variations thereof impact cancer patients. The PHL research program is largely built around their expertise in using registry and claims data to address these lines of inquiry.



    Population Science

    Type: Clinical Organization

    Summary:

    Biostatistics (BSR) and Trace Elements (TE)



    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    Type: Association

    Summary:

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) is a national clinical cooperative group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1968 to increase the survival and improve the quality of life of patients diagnosed with cancer. The primary areas of research for RTOG investigators are: brain tumors, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, cancers of the gastrointestinal system (esophagus, pancreas, rectum, anal canal and stomach), genitourinary tract cancers (bladder and prostate), sarcomas, gynecologic cancer (cervix) and breast cancer. The Group consists of both clinical and laboratory investigators from over 360 institutions across the United States and Canada and includes in its membership nearly 90% of all NCI-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers. The Group Headquarters and Statistical Unit are located in the Philadelphia offices of the American College of Radiology. The Group Chair is Walter J. Curran, Jr., M.D. the Executive Director of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.



    Rzucidlo Heart and Vascular Research Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation

    Professional Interests:
    1) Intimal hyperplasia and restenosis of stents is like a cancer of the arteries.
    2)Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has recently been described as a novel profibrotic factor.
    3) Polymer-based drug eluting stents have drastically reduced restenosis. Issues related to potential tradeoffs between efficacy and safety has received increasing attention due to increased risk of late thrombosis.
    4) Sirtiuns have long been considered the anti-aging target. Since aging leads to a progressive decline in multiple organ systems, including the pancreas and heart it is not surprising that sirtiun benefits are now being realized in diabetes and CVD.



    SWOG

    Type: Funding Organization

    Summary:

    SWOG (formerly the Southwest Oncology Group) is one of the largest cancer clinical trials cooperative groups in the United States. Funded largely by research grants from the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, the Group conducts clinical trials to prevent and treat cancer in adults, and to improve the quality of life for cancer survivors.



    Saito Genetics Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our lab uses C. elegans genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology techniques to reveal the mechanisms that direct cells to either divide or arrest during development. We are interested in this decision since cells that are unable to properly control cell divisions can result in developmental defects and cancer. To understand how the cell-cycle machinery is controlled in response to developmental signals we use the highly regulated cell divisions of C. elegans as a model system.



    Sanchez Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    "Cells have evolved intricate networks of proteins or signal transduction pathways that allow them to integrate internal or external signals in order to respond to specific cues during development and during stress. Molecules that originate from neighboring cells, tissues, and pathogens, can act over short and long distances to elicit a physiological response. Signaling pathways can also be triggered within the cell, as is the case when cells are placed under alert following DNA damage or when there is a problem with DNA replication. Such information is transmitted via protein-protein interactions and protein modifications and leads to the alteration of gene expression and other events that regulate cell division, DNA repair or cell death. Our laboratory focuses on checkpoint signaling events triggered by DNA damage or replication interference. We are taking genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches to study these signaling pathways. We are interested in dissecting signaling complexes involved in the response to lesions that are caused by DNA damaging agents or stalled replication forks and determining how specific protein-protein interactions and cellular location are regulated to transmit this information. We are also interested in the interactions between the signaling molecules and the enzymes that function in DNA replication and repair.

    The pathways that we study are involved in both the etiology and treatment of cancer. Loss-of-function mutations in mammalian checkpoint genes compromise the response to DNA damage at the cellular level and at the level of the organism lead to a predisposition to cancer. In addition, cancer therapies frequently rely on drugs or agents that trigger genomic instability by taking advantage of the fact that cancer cells have defects in the response to DNA damage."

    For a description of projects, see research: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~sanchezlab/



    Schaller Biology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    "We are interested in the mechanisms by which plants grow and respond to changes in their environment. Plants make use of a diverse group of signaling compounds to regulate growth and development. Although some of these compounds were identified almost a century ago, only recently has significant progress been made in identifying the proteins involved in sensing and transducing these signals. Much of this work has been accomplished by using the plant Arabidopsis, which serves as a model organism for addressing basic questions in plant biology. My laboratory uses a combination of biochemical, molecular, and genetic strategies to analyze signaling pathways in Arabidopsis."

    Research projects:
    1. Mechanism of cytokinin signal transduction in Arabadopsis
    2. Mechanism of ethylene signal transduction in Arabadopsis



    Science Division Electronics Shop

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    David Collins is NASA certified for electrical assembly.



    Scripps Research Institute

    Type: Institute

    Summary:

    The Scripps Research Institute, one of the world's largest, private, non-profit research organizations, stands at the forefront of basic biomedical science, a vital segment of medical research that seeks to comprehend the most fundamental processes of life. Over the last decades, the institute has established a lengthy track record of major contributions to the betterment of health and the human condition.



    Shared Equipment Rubin 6 and 7

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    Dartmouth researchers have access to 37 Shared Resource instruments which are housed in various labs throughout the 6th and 7th floors of the Rubin building.

    Please note:
    See individual instruments and protocols for location and the lab responsible.
    No cost is involved; be sure to clean up when finished.
    The "responsible lab" provides necessary instrument training.



    Shared Instruments Core Laboratory

    Type: Core Laboratory



    Shworak Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory



    Spaller Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Spaller lab specializes in the study of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions of biological and medicinal significance, focusing on those that regulate oncogenic and neuronal signal transduction pathways. Our efforts encompass aspects that are both fundamental—investigating the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms—and applied—developing reagents that will serve as molecular probes in biological studies, or as compounds for use in drug development.



    Speed Congenics Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Speed Congenics Service facilitates the development of congenic mice in support of pre-clinical projects; provides expert advice on mouse speed congenic development, mouse genetic background analysis, and mouse genetic mapping.



    Stan Microbiology and Immunology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    We are a cellular and molecular biology laboratory doing research focused on the molecular mechanisms of microvascular permeability. We are interested in both normal permeability and the changes it incurs in inflammation and angiogenesis in tumors and wound healing.



    Statistical Genetics Laboratory (SGL)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The goal of the Statistical Genetics Laboratory (SGL) is to understand human health and disease through the development and application of statistical methods for identifying genetic risk factors. The SGL is interested in the genetic epidemiology of lung and colon cancer and the gene mapping of causal factors and modifier loci for rare syndromes including Lynch syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The SGL is also interested in the genetic epidemiology of select autoimmune conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and alopecia areata. The SGL facilitates these studies through the collection and management of data from family studies and is interested in the design of clinical studies to identify predictors of cancer development and progression.



    Statistical Genomics Laboratory (SGL)

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    The goal of the Statistical Genomics Laboratory (SGL) is to develop cutting-edge biostatistical methods for the analysis of high-dimensional omics data. Recent work has focused on the detection of gene-gene interactions in genome-wide association data.



    Surgical Research Laboratory (SRL)

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Surgical Research Laboratory (SRL) is a bench laboratory and experimental OR research facility located in the Borwell building that originated more than 30 years ago.

    The SRL is operated under the oversight of the Department of Surgery and is directed by P. Jack Hoopes DVM, PhD.

    The SRL experimental animal operating suite includes state-of-the-art anesthesia delivery and monitoring, dedicated clinical fluoroscopy/angiography, ultrasound as well as a laser and ionizing radiation laboratory. The facility contains five permanent microsurgery operating microscope positions. Imaging modalities currently available for use include MRI, CT, PET, micro CT, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging for large and small animal models. Expertise and instrumentation for endoscopy and laparoscopy are also available. An advanced intraoperative imaging facility has been funded and is under development.

    Our bench laboratory plays an integral part in Dartmouth being designated as a Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) with a grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). CCNEs are tasked with integrating nanotechnology into basic and applied cancer research in order to provide new solutions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Our lab focus is on determining the optimal way to use alternating magnetic field-excited magnetic nanoparticle-mediated therapy to treat cancer, either as already confirmed in the breast/head and neck or as potentially unidentified multi-focal micro-metastases that remain after initial re-treatment. This project has both basic science and translational goals that will enhance the understanding of magnetic nanoparticle-mediated therapy, and also will explore crucial parameters that must be determined in order to design clinical trials.



    Taub Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Two main themes: understanding 1) the biological basis of spatial cognition and 2) the neurobiological mechanisms underlying learning and memory.



    Taylor Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Our work focuses on vaccine and drug development for prevention and treatment of epidemic cholera, which is spread aquatically in unhygienic conditions. Our current efforts involve interference with the production and function of a protein, TcpA, that forms specialized pili on the surface of the marine bacterium, Vibrio cholerae and facilitates infection of humans. The pili allow the bacteria to self-adhere, forming particles that become entrapped within the architecture of the human intestine where the bacteria release cholera toxin, causing severe, life-threatening diarrhea. The research encompasses studies on epitope specific protective immune responses as well as selective drug targets for cholera prevention. The studies are generally applicable to a number of serious infectious diseases such as meningitis, hemorrhagic colitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and infections associated with cystic fibrosis.



    Technology Transfer Office

    Type: Technology Transfer Office

    Summary:

    The Dartmouth Technology Transfer Office (TTO) considers itself a facilitator of various interactions with industry and non-profit institutions by faculty, researchers, and administrators at the College and its professional schools. Our staff reviews Consulting Agreements, secures Confidentiality Agreements, assists in negotiating terms and conditions in private foundation’s grants, writes letters of support for grant proposals, and negotiates CRDAs with Federal Laboratories. The TTO also assists investigators in establishing research collaborations with other academic institutions via the Interinstitutional Agreement mechanism. Knowledge dissemination and contribution to a broadly defined research infrastructure are becoming increasingly important to TTO activity and illustrate the expansion of the Office’s mission., The purpose of Dartmouth's Technology Transfer Office (TTO) stems from the Public Law 96 -517, the Bayh-Dole Act, which postulates that the inventions arising from Federal Government sponsorship and assigned to the university, must be actively transferred to the private sector for the benefit of the general public.



    Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    Type: School

    Summary:

    One of the oldest engineering schools in the country, Thayer School was founded by Dartmouth alumnus Sylvanus Thayer who believed that engineering in the context of a liberal arts education provides the best preparation for solving the world's problems.

    At Dartmouth there is only one engineering department—Thayer School itself. One department, one building, one mission. Expertise from across the engineering disciplines converge to enhance innovation. People here share ideas, challenges, and inspiration and push each other to solve pressing global problems.



    The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice (TDI)

    Type: Institute

    Summary:

    TDI’s unique community of clinician-scholars, epidemiologists, economists, social scientists, statisticians, and others are putting forth solutions, offering innovative and achievable policy changes, and proving through demonstration how health care can be delivered more effectively, with better outcomes, improved patient and provider satisfaction, and at less cost.



    The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice: Data and Analytic Core (DAC)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Data and Analytic Core (DAC) includes research analysts and programmers, research assistants, a data librarian, and a Director who reports to the Director of the Center for Health Policy Research and the DAC Advisory Committee.

    The DACs responsibilities are to maintain an extremely secure environment for health care datasets provided to Principal Investigators by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, state governments, and other organizations under data use agreements and licenses. The DAC works under the direction of faculty investigators who have specific permission to use the data to conducted research.

    The DAC consists of 15 analysts (and an additional 5 staff) with a combined 150 years of healthcare claims analytic experience and a mastery of a broad range of programming and statistical methods. New analysts undergo a comprehensive training program lasting the better part of 6 months to assure a strong foundation in Medicare data analytics.



    Tiltfactor Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Tiltfactor™ Laboratory is a conceptual design lab that researches, designs, launches, and publishes games and interactive experiences related to technology and human values.

    We are a human-centered laboratory asking the big, important questions about where our technology is heading, and how we might improve it. Looking at gender and technology, empathy in games, novel educational methods, while influencing design processes to be more humanist in nature —focusing on human values and concerns—Tiltfactor is the place to think about how technology is meaningful, and how it can be designed for a more just, equitable, and innovative society.



    Tomlinson Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    This lab has several research projects ongoing in the laboratory with the common theme of using high-throughput genomics approaches to study gene/environment interactions in development and disease

    First, this lab studies the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in adult-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD). These studies are a test of the Barker hypothesis, which originated from epidemiological studies to explain the correlation between low birth rate and CVD, diabetes, obesity, and other adult onset diseases. The concept of the Barker hypothesis has been expanded to include in utero insults such as exposure to environmental agents that might influence developmental programs that adversely affect the fetus. The expanded Barker hypothesis, simply stated, is that an in utero stress; be it nutritional, chemical (drug or toxicant exposure), or physical; increases the likelihood that children borne of that mother will develop adult onset diseases and that this enhanced risk of disease is passed on to subsequent generations.

    Using a mouse model system, they are testing the hypothesis that an in utero exposure of a toxicant to the fetus alters global AHR-regulated gene expression and genome-wide methylation patterns to reprogram the developing CV system resulting in heritable, trans-generational adult-onset cardiovascular disease. Thus, the primary objective of our work is to (1) correlate genome-wide methylation and global RNA expression profiles to identify those genes, signaling pathways, and developmental programs affected by a toxicant exposure during development that leads to an adult disease, and (2) determine whether the epigenetic changes in the developmental programs are inherited.

    A second project in the lab is to develop new genomics technologies to examine all levels of gene expression (Fig. 3). The project involves the study of the global expression of RNA at the levels of transcription, the roles of DNA methylation in gene expression, the rates of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA turnover, the accurate measurement of steady-state mRNA levels, and the regulation of polysome entry.

    A third project in our laboratory is to determine the role of the AHR in mediating the effects of curcumin (and arsenic) on cystic fibrosis. Approximately 3,500 babies are born with CF annually, which dooms them to a drastically impaired lifestyle and reduced lifespan. Both curcumin (Fig. 4) and arsenic are ligands for the AHR. We culture human bronchial airway epithelia isolated from a ΔF508CFTR-/- patient (CFBE) and isogenic cells (CFBE+wtCFTR) complemented with the wild type cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The CFBE and CFBE+wtCFTR cells are manipulated by siRNA methods such that the Ahr gene is expressed at either relatively high or low levels. A distinct advantage of using this strategy is that by virtue of the integral role the AHR plays in response to environmental agents, any corresponding differences observed in the inflammatory response and in gene expression and regulation profiles are due to the differing capacities of the AHR response. Thus, these studies are a superb means to study gene (Ahr) / environment (As or curcumin) interactions and their roles in lung inflammation.



    Trace Element Analysis (TEA)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several "hyphenated" techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.



    Trace Element Analysis (TEA)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Trace Element Analysis (TEA) laboratory specializes in low-level trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological samples. We use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals analysis and several "hyphenated" techniques that couple instruments together for speciation analyses of water, soil and biological tissue samples.



    Transgenics and Genetic Constructs (TGC)

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    The Transgenics and Genetic Constructs Resource (see link) supports the generation and utilization of genetically modified mice by members of the Dartmouth research community. We offer a wide variety of services that assist researchers in construct design and creation of novel transgenic mice. We also offer mice with a human immune system that allows our investigators a better way to study viruses and other human infections. The

    Speed Congenics Service (see link) facilitates the development of congenic mice in support of pre-clinical projects. We provide expert advice on mouse speed congenic development, mouse genetic background analysis and mouse genetic mapping.



    Transgenics and Genetic Constructs Resource

    Type: Core Laboratory

    Summary:

    We support the generation and utilization of genetically modified mice by members of the Dartmouth research community. We offer a wide variety of services that assist researchers in construct design and creation of novel transgenic mice. We also offer mice with a human immune system that allows our investigators a better way to study virus and other human infections.



    Translational Research Core

    Type: Service providing laboratory

    Summary:

    With support from the NCRR COBRE Program Project and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Research Development Program, the Lung Biology Center offers the following core services.

    The goal of the Lung Biology Translational Core is to provide support to basic science investigators and physician-scientists focused on translational research who require access to clinical specimens from patients with lung disease to support their work and expand preliminary observations into human subjects. This Core facilitates ongoing studies of current and former COBRE Lung Biology investigators and investigators with pilot projects. The Translational Research Core coordinates with the Advanced Imaging and the Cell Biology and Target Discovery Cores to facilitate translational studies at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. The Translational Core also provides assistance with IRB human subject study approvals, and feedback on project design and implementation.



    Translational Science

    Type: Clinical Organization

    Summary:

    Clinical Pharmacology (CP)
    Irradiation, Preclinical Imaging, & Microscopy (IPIM)
    Pathology (PSR)
    Transgenic & Genetic Constructs (TGC)



    Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth

    Type: School

    Summary:

    Founded in 1900 as the first graduate school of management, the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth has long been recognized among the leading business schools in the world. It is one of three professional schools of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire.

    Tuck offers only one degree—the full-time MBA. Our small scale promotes a community that values learning, collaboration, and sharing. In this environment our graduates develop the knowledge, perspective, and skills to lead organizations.

    The residential experience is a foundation of the Tuck culture, which includes teamwork and the building of lifelong relationships. Students and partners live on or near campus, making social events and shared activities a way of life.

    From our core curriculum of general management skills to advanced electives and seminars, our students have exceptional access to a preeminent faculty of thought leaders, all of whom teach in the MBA program.

    To our students, we offer intellectual depth, abundant resources, and individual attention. To our alumni, we provide a lifelong connection to excellence. And to the world, a commitment to ethical and responsible leadership.



    Turk Immunology Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research in the Turk Laboratory focuses on understanding how the immune system responds to progressive, poorly immunogenic cancers. We are interested in CD8+ effector and memory T cells that are primed by progressive tumors, and the CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells that suppress these anti-tumor immune responses. Our overall goal is to generate durable protective immunity in tumor-bearing hosts, without the use of active immunization (vaccines). We focus on manipulating the host’s own immune milieu during tumor growth to induce long-lived protection against recurrent and metastatic disease.



    U.S. Department of Education

    Type: Government Agency

    Summary:

    The mission of the Department of Education is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. It engages in four major types of activities:

    - Establishes policies related to federal education funding, administers distribution of funds and monitors their use.
    - Collects data and oversees research on America's schools.
    - Identifies major issues in education and focuses national attention on them.
    - Enforces federal laws prohibiting discrimination in programs that receive federal funds.



    University of Barcelona, Spain

    Type: University



    University of Kuopio, Finland

    Type: University



    University of New Hampshire

    Type: College

    Summary:

    UNH is a vibrant place: a land-, sea-, and space-grant university where undergraduate and graduate students engage in daily discovery and the intellectual excitement of doing research with their faculty mentors.



    Usherwood Microbiology and Immunology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Generation and maintenance of T cell memory, immune therapies

    The Usherwood lab has a long-standing interest in T cell immunity to viruses, particularly persistent virus infections. The large majority of the human population is infected by multiple persistent viruses. In some cases (HIV, Hepatitis C) this results in disease in all or a large proportion of those infected. However in many cases infection is clinically silent, and the infected individual suffers no adverse effects. In fact there is some evidence suggesting persistent infection may be beneficial in aiding the immune response repel other infections. During viral persistence there is a dynamic equilibrium between the virus and the immune response. One of our missions is to understand this interplay, and to determine the effect that the persistent infection has upon responding T cells, and conversely how the T cell response keeps the infection under control for very long periods of time. An important long-term goal of the laboratory is to develop immunotherapies that can restore immune surveillance in immune suppressed patients who suffer disease due to the loss of immune control of persistent infection. These immunotherapies could potentially also be useful in other conditions such as enhancing immune surveillance against tumor metastasis.

    We use predominantly one persistent and one acute virus infection models in the lab:

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68, γHV-68)



    Van Citters Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research Interests

    Orthopaedic failure analysis and design; wear of polymers; polymer processing; biomaterials and surgical device design

    Current Research Projects:

    Joint replacement technology
    Orthopaedic biomaterials and tribology
    Polymer Processing



    Vincenti Laboratory

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Research in Dr. Vincenti's laboratory examines IL-1-dependent stimulation of MMP-1 in synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. These studies have established that IL-1 activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways are critical processes for transcriptional activation of MMP-1 in these cells. Ongoing research is defining specific components of these pathways that are involved. Specifically, they have found that RelA and Bcl-3 are two NF-κB family members that are absolutely required for gene activation. Furthermore, IL-1 activation of the ERK pathway leads to phosphorylation of the transcription factor C/EBPβ, which directly binds to the MMP-1 promoter and facilitates transcription.

    A second project in the laboratory investigates a group of plant-derived compounds known as triterpenoids. These compounds inhibit inflammation and reduce inflammation-induced MMP gene expression. TP-222, which is a triterpenoid that is highly bioavailable through oral administration to mice, effectively inhibits MMP-13 gene expression by chondrocytes and MMP-9 expression by osteoclasts. They are particularly interested in the molecular mechanisms through which TP-222 reduces MMP mRNA levels in these cells. It is hoped that this work will lead to the development of novel drugs that block cartilage destruction in arthritis and bone erosion in arthritis and osteoporosis.



    Weaver Radiology Lab

    Type: Laboratory

    Summary:

    Interests include MR elastography, magnetic nanoparticle imaging, using magnetic nanoparticles as biomarkers for temperature and tissue stiffness, MR acquisition and pulse sequence development, digital image processing.



    White River Junction VA Medical Center

    Type: Hospital

    Summary:

    The White River Junction VA Medical Center (VAMC) is responsible for delivery of health care to eligible veterans in Vermont and 4 neighboring counties in New Hampshire. Those services are delivered at our main campus at WRJ and in our four Community Based Outpatient Clinics in Bennington, Rutland, and Colchester VT and Littleton, NH. The WRJ VA is closely affiliated with Dartmouth Medical School (DMS) and multiple other nursing and allied health affiliations.



    Women In Science Project

    Type: Center

    Summary:

    WISP’s mission is to collaborate in creating a learning environment where women can thrive in science, engineering and mathematics. This broad goal is achieved by enhancing the experiences of Dartmouth women, particularly in their first year, through a comprehensive set of proven intervention strategies, including:

    - Mentoring
    - Early hands-on research experience
    - Role models
    - Access to information
    - Building a community in the sciences

    Dartmouth College established WISP in 1990 to address the under-representation of women in science, mathematics, and engineering. Dartmouth designed WISP with a focus on retaining women in science and an emphasis on women in their first year. Recognizing that women leave science for many reasons, WISP encompassed a variety of programs providing undergraduate and graduate women throughout their academic careers with mentors and role models, information on educational and career opportunities in science, academic support, and a community of women engaged in the study of science.



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